breaking-news

Nadler prepares contempt vote for McGahn — but what are the consequences?
The White House argued McGahn has ‘absolute immunity’ and isn’t legally required to comply with a congressional subpoena

Then-White House counsel Don McGahn listens to testimony at the Senate Judiciary Committee’s Supreme Court confirmation hearing for Brett Kavanaugh in Hart Building in September. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler is preparing a committee vote to hold former White House counsel Don McGahn in contempt of Congress, the second Trump official to get such treatment for defying one of Nadler’s subpoenas to testify about the special counsel investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election.

“Let me be clear: this Committee will hear Mr. McGahn’s testimony, even if we have to go to court to secure it. We will not allow the President to prevent the American people from hearing from this witness,” Nadler said at a hearing Tuesday for McGahn that the former White House lawyer skipped per the administration’s orders.

Iran escalations bring war powers debates back to the Capitol
Sen. Tim Kaine expects debate behind closed doors at the Armed Services Committee

Senate Foreign Relations Chairman Jim Risch says President Donald Trump “doesn’t need any more authority than what he’s got” to respond to a potential attack. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call file photo)k

A Senate briefing by the Trump administration Tuesday about the escalation in tensions with Iran appears certain to kick off another round of sparring over the president’s war powers.

When asked last week whether President Donald Trump could strike Iran using existing authorities from the authorization for use of military force that was enacted after 9/11, the chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee reflected on the history of disputes between the executive and legislative branches.

De Blasio makes it 23
New York mayor says ‘it’s time to put working people first’ in campaign launch

New York Mayor Bill de Blasio holds up a copy of “One NYC 2050” as he speaks about the city’s response to climate change in April. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images file photo)

New York Mayor Bill de Blasio on Thursday announced he is running for the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination, making him the 23rd major candidate in the race to take on Donald Trump.

In a campaign video, de Blasio says he has taken Trump on before and he’s ready to do it again.

Rayburn evacuated after alarms sound throughout building
The exact cause of the alarm and evacuation is not yet known

Rep. Earl Blumenauer, D-Ore. holds a meeting in between Rayburn and Longworth after alarms sounded throughout the Rayburn House Office Building causing an evacuation Tuesday, May 14, 2019. (Katherine Tully-McManus/ CQ Roll Call)

Lawmakers, staff and visitors were evacuated for almost two hours on Tuesday afternoon after fire alarms sounded throughout the Rayburn House Office Building.

Capitol Police and Architect of the Capitol staff were on the scene, including a fire marshal and emergency management personnel. Staff was evacuated at about 1:30 p.m. and allowed to return after 3:15 p.m. 

Anthony Weiner is a free man
Former New York Democrat walks out of Bronx halfway house free, but registered a Level 1 sex offender

Former Rep. Anthony Weiner leaves Manhattan Federal Court, September 25, 2017 in New York City. Weiner was sentenced to 21 months in prison for sexting with a minor. He was released from a Bronx halfway house on Tuesday. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

Anthony Weiner is free.

The former New York Democratic congressman and New York City mayoral candidate emerged from a Bronx halfway house on Tuesday after spending more than a year-and-a-half behind bars, first in Massachusetts and later in the Bronx.

These Senate Democrats want to ban stock trading by members of Congress
Sens. Brown and Merkley introduce legislation last week to prohibit trading in most cases

Sens. Jeff Merkley, D-Ore., left, and Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, want to ban stock trading by members of Congress in most cases. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Two Democratic senators want to prevent a recurrence of ethically dubious stock trades by members of Congress by banning them altogether.

Sens. Jeff Merkley of Oregon and Sherrod Brown of Ohio want to bar lawmakers and senior aides from buying and selling individual securities. The reality is that many members of the House and Senate do own and trade stock in publicly-traded companies.

Pentagon moves $1.5 billion more to border wall
Senate Democrats, led by Durbin, are contesting the decision

Sen. Richard J. Durbin, D-Ill., is the top Democrat on the Defense Appropriations subcommittee. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Updated 4:02 p.m. | The Defense Department is taking $1.5 billion from what officials there are calling lower-priority programs and redirecting it toward projects aimed at securing the U.S.-Mexico border, according to a Pentagon budget document.

The shift brings to $2.5 billion the amount of defense money diverted to date for the border wall project, with up to $3.6 billion more to come from military construction projects under President Donald Trump’s national emergency declaration issued in January.

Trump would have been charged with obstruction if he wasn’t president, nearly 400 former federal prosecutors say
To look at Mueller report and say an obstruction conviction couldn’t be sustained ‘runs counter to logic and our experience’

Former federal prosecutors from both Democratic and Republican administrations identified several areas from the redacted Mueller report that they say constituted obstruction of justice charges that could be filed against Donald Trump if he wasn’t protected by an Office of Legal Counsel policy against indicting a sitting president. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Nearly 400 former federal prosecutors, many of whom worked at the Department of Justice under both Republican and Democratic administrations, believe President Donald Trump would have been charged with obstruction of justice if he was not in the Oval Office.

“Each of us believes that the conduct of President Trump described in Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s report would, in the case of any other person not covered by the Office of Legal Counsel policy against indicting a sitting President, result in multiple felony charges for obstruction of justice,” the former prosecutors wrote in a joint statement posted on Medium on Monday.

Trump selects Mark Morgan to lead ICE, but will he ever get a Senate hearing?
Morgan been appearing in recent weeks on Fox News to talk immigration, the Mueller report

A U.S. Border Patrol agent watches over the U.S.-Mexico border at dusk on July 22, 2018 in Nogales, Arizona. President Trump selected Mark Morgan Obama-era chief of the Border Patrol to be the next director of Immigration and Customs Enforcement. (John Moore/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump said Sunday that he has selected an Obama-era chief of the U.S. Border Patrol to be the next director of Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

“I am pleased to inform all of those that believe in a strong, fair and sound Immigration Policy that Mark Morgan will be joining the Trump Administration as the head of our hard working men and women of ICE,” Trump tweeted on Sunday. “Mark is a true believer and American Patriot.”

Sen. Mike Enzi announces he will retire rather than seek a fifth term
Wyoming Republican has served in the Senate for more that two decades

Sen. Michael B. Enzi, R-Wyo., announced Saturday that he will not run for re-election in 2020. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Wyoming Republican Michael B. Enzi announced Saturday that he will not run for re-election in 2020 after more than two decades in the Senate.

Enzi’s decision — which he announced at a press conference in Wyoming, according to the Casper Star-Tribune — opens up a seat in the strongly Republican state.