cq-on-congress-podcast

Do Debt and Deficits Matter? It Depends on Who's Minding U.S. Fiscal Policy: Podcast
CQ on Congress, Episode 116

Chairman Kevin Brady, R-Texas, sits in front of books of the U.S. tax code, during a House Ways and Means Committee markup of the Republicans' tax reform plan in November. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Congressional Budget Office recently revised its earlier, already dire warning that the national debt will be 150 percent larger than the entire U.S. economy within 30 years — and GOP budget and tax proposals could make a bad situation much worse.

CQ News editors Patrick B. Pexton and Pete Cohn discuss the political landscape of debt and deficits heading into what could be a fateful midterm election.

Space Farce? The Challenges of Creating a New Military Department in Just 2 Years: Podcast
CQ on Congress, Episode 115

On Thursday, Vice President Mike Pence announced the Trump administration's plan to create a U.S. Space Force by 2020. ( Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Space is the “next battlefield,” Vice President Mike Pence said this week. CQ editor Patrick B. Pexton talks with reporter Andrew Clevenger about all the steps needed to create the Space Force. The biggest challenge? A just-passed, two-year defense authorization bill that’s on the president’s desk awaiting his signature. That bill has no extra funds for such an ambitious enterprise that critics say isn’t even necessary to protect the U.S. from space-based threats.

A GOP Congress Tries to Limit Its Republican President on Foreign Policy: Podcast
CQ on Congress, Episode 114

Sen. Jeff Flake, R-Ariz., is one of the more outspoken GOP lawmakers questioning President Donald Trump's foreign policy. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Podcast: House Lawmakers Leave Town With Much to Do Before Midterms
CQ on Congress, Episode 113

Speaker of the House Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis.(Photo By Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call)

Podcast: Why Congress Has a Russia Problem
CQ on Congress, Episode 112

President Donald Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin at joint press conference after their summit in Helsinki, Finland. (Chris McGrath/Getty Images)

Podcast: Two Senators on How They Got a Bipartisan Farm Bill
CQ on Congress, Episode 111

Senate Agriculture Committee Chairman Pat Roberts, R-Kan., center, and ranking member Sen. Debbie Stabenow, D-Mich., prepare for a podcast with CQ editor Shawn Zeller in Hart Building on July 12, 2018. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

"I'm all for principles, but I'm not an ideologue," says Senate Agriculture Chairman Pat Roberts of Kansas in explaining why he wrote a farm bill that doesn't add new work requirements to the food stamps program. He and the Agriculture panel's ranking Democrat, Debbie Stabenow of Michigan, explain their bipartisan approach as they prepare for a fight with the House conservatives pushing the food stamp changes.

 

Podcast: Over the Moon for the Mission to Mars
CQ on Congress, Episode 110

NASA administrator Jim Bridenstine is interviewed for CQ on Congress podcast at the CQ Roll Call studio in Washington. (Photo by Thomas McKinless/CQ Roll Call)

Podcast: On Civility, the Resistance Splits
CQ on Congress, Episode 109

Congresswomen Nancy Pelosi and Maxine Waters and Adam B. Schiff speak onstage at the LA Pride ResistMarch on June 11, 2017 in West Hollywood, California. (Photo by Emma McIntyre/Getty Images)

Podcast: An Immigration Hardliner's Reasoning
CQ on Congress, Episode 108

A group of mothers and their children protesting the separation of families at the southern border are escorted out of a House Oversight hearing Tuesday June 19, 2018. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call)

Dan Stein, president of the Federation for American Immigration Reform, says tough border policies are crucial to helping low-skilled workers in America. And CQ immigration reporter Dean DeChiaro breaks down the immigration enforcement bill that failed in the House on June 21, and Speaker Paul Ryan's compromise measure, still pending in the House, which would give so-called Dreamers a path to citizenship.

Podcast: Some Red States Coming Around to Obamacare
CQ on Congress, Episode 107

Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., speaks during the Senate Democrats' rally against Medicaid cuts in front of the U.S. Capitol on  June 6, 2017. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Voters in some GOP-leaning states will get a chance to adopt the 2010 health care law's Medicaid expansion by ballot initiative this November while others may elect governors who support it, says CQ health care reporter Misty Williams. It's an indication that even some conservative states are coming to accept the Affordable Care Act as the law of the land.

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