defense

How Congress might rewrite Trump’s budget
CQ Budget Podcast, Episode 103

Copies of President Donald Trump’s budget for Fiscal Year 2020 are prepared for distribution at the Government Publishing Office in Washington. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Trump overshadows Brazilian president’s visit by attacking Kellyanne Conway’s husband
President dubs George Conway a ‘total loser’ after attorney challenged Trump’s mental health

Kellyanne Conway speaks to the press outside of the White House on the North Lawn. President Trump and her husband, George Conway, are in the midst of a Twitter feud. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A number of foreign leaders have visited the White House in recent weeks with little fanfare, but President Donald Trump’s aides are setting big expectations for Tuesday’s visit by the “Trump of the Tropics.”

Yet, on what White House officials hope will be a paradigm-shifting day, Trump and his team got an early start on stepping on their own intended message about “fundamentally” overhauling relations with South America’s largest economy.

3 Things to Watch: Kim lets Trump know their ‘mysteriously wonderful’ chemistry isn’t enough
‘There is no sign he’s stopped producing missiles,’ analyst says of North Korean strongman

South Koreans watch coverage of President Donald Trump meeting with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un during their summit in Hanoi, Vietnam, before talks collapsed. (Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images file photo)

ANALYSIS President Donald Trump once claimed he and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un “fell in love.” But the dictator he once called “Little Rocket Man” let him know on Friday that their “mysteriously wonderful” relationship might not be enough to strike a disarmament pact.

As recently as Wednesday, the U.S. commander in chief signaled he continues to believe the unlikely warm relationship with Kim could drive a deal under which Kim would give up his nuclear arms.

These GOP senators voted to potentially let Trump pull funds from military projects back home
Votes could carry some risk for Republicans up for re-election in 2020

Sen. Thom Tillis, R-N.C., voted “no” on a resolution to revoke President Donald Trump’s authority to shift military construction funds, putting funds for several military bases in his state at risk. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Some Republican senators who voted Thursday against terminating the President Donald Trump’s national emergency declaration may face backlash for risking military projects in their home states.

Twelve GOP senators joined all Democrats in voting for the joint resolution to block the president’s bid to redirect up to $6.7 billion from other Cabinet departments for his southern border wall. But 41 Republicans, some facing competitive re-elections in 2020, voted against the measure. 

After bitter fight, defense budget will stay high
The hard-fought outcome is likely to be a bipartisan accord keeping defense spending at historically high levels

A Manned Ground Vehicle (MGV) chassis, an Abrams A1 tank, and a pair of Stryker Leader Followers during a demonstration of future combat systems (Scott Ferrell/CQ Roll Call file photo)

ANALYSIS — President Donald Trump’s defense budget request is sparking partisan discord that will last for months, but the hard-fought outcome is likely to be a bipartisan accord to keep defense spending at its historically high level.

The conflict is real. A House controlled by Democrats will not easily swallow Trump’s proposal to slash spending on nondefense programs by 9 percent at the same time as he wants a nearly 5 percent increase in defense spending. Trump’s $750 billion request for the Pentagon and other defense accounts marks one of the biggest peacetime defense budgets since World War II, even adjusting for inflation.

Trump budget request triggers clash with Congress
CQ Budget Podcast, Episode 102

Copies of President Donald Trump’s budget for Fiscal Year 2020 are prepared for distribution at the Government Publishing Office in Washington. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

U.S. commander warns of risks from Trump’s troop withdrawal
Votel’s testimony clashes with recent remarks by the president, who has celebrated the complete defeat of the Islamic State

Army Gen. Joseph Votel says the Islamic State remains a dangerous threat and that the president’s plan to withdraw troops from Syria and Afghanistan could be risky. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The U.S. commander in the Middle East warned lawmakers Thursday about the risks of President Donald Trump’s plans to withdraw American forces from Syria and Afghanistan.

The Islamic State terrorist group is down to less than one square mile of territory in Iraq and Syria, but the group has made a “calculated decision” to lay low and remains a dangerous threat, Army Gen. Joseph Votel told the House Armed Services Committee.

Martha McSally says officer raped her when she was in Air Force
Arizona Republican opens up during hearing on sexual assault in the military

Sen. Martha McSally, R-Ariz., revealed that while in the Air Force, she was raped by a superior officer. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Sen. Martha McSally revealed Wednesday that while in the Air Force, she was raped by a superior officer. McSally, the first female fighter pilot to fly in combat, spoke out at a Senate Armed Services hearing on the military’s efforts to respond to and prevent sexual assaults.

The Arizona Republican served 26 years in the military. McSally said she did not report being sexually assaulted by the officer because she did not trust the system in place to handle such a case.

As Dems rev up investigations, Trump declares ‘the campaign begins’
President again says legislation unlikely to move as opposition party’s probes get serious

President Donald Trump shows reporters Space Policy Directive 4 after he signed it on Feb. 19 in the Oval Office. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump on Tuesday said House Democrats’ decision to launch multiple investigations of him and his associates — including a massive documents request — marks the start of the 2020 campaign season.

“They want to do that instead of getting legislation done,” Trump told reporters during a veterans event at the White House. “Basically they've started the campaign. So the campaign begins.”