district-of-columbia

Congressional Baseball Game Highlights
57th annual Democrats vs. Republicans game for charities at Nationals Park in Washington

Rep. Tim Ryan, D-Ohio, tags out Rep. Fred Upton, R-Mich., at third base during the 57th annual Congressional Baseball Game at Nationals Park on Thursday. The Democrats prevailed 21-5. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Democratic members of Congress beat their Republican counterparts, 21-5, Thursday in the annual Congressional Baseball Game for Charity at Nationals Park in Washington.

Rep. Cedric L. Richmond pitched a complete game for the Democrats, who won 11-2 last year. 

Is Trump Coming to the Congressional Baseball Game?
White House has not said whether president will attend

House Majority Whip Steve Scalise, R-La., left, will be back on the field for this year's Congressional Baseball Game. But will President Donald Trump be in attendance? (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

As Capitol Hill gears up for this year’s traditional congressional charity baseball game, one invited guest has not yet RSVP'd: President Donald Trump.

Republican Rep. Roger Williams of Texas, the coach of the GOP team, said he invited Trump to attend on a recent visit to the Oval Office, The Associated Press reported.

Curtailed Recess Puts Summer Fundraising, Lobbying in Flux
Senators may seek new campaign events in D.C. if they will be here anyway

Kansas Sen. Jerry Moran’s summer retreat fundraiser is slated for Aug. 12-14. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The official Senate calendar isn’t the only agenda in flux after Majority Leader Mitch McConnell announced he would cancel much of the chamber’s cherished summer recess.

The change may also disrupt plans for fundraising events outside Washington — as well as the dockets of lobbyists, who typically take their annual respite along with the congressional recess.

Trade Groups in Turmoil in the Trump Era
Industry associations change dramatically with the times

When Tim Pawlenty announced earlier this year that he was walking away from the Financial Services Roundtable, K Street expected the group to put out a “help wanted” sign. Instead, the membership pushed for consolidation. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

When Pamela Bailey, who heads the Grocery Manufacturers Association, announced in February that she will leave her $3 million-a-year gig, it came as no shock. After all, the lobbying group had in the past year lost some of its biggest members, including candy-maker Mars Inc. and Tyson Foods, the world’s second-largest producer of chicken, beef and pork.

The organization is undergoing a “reinvention,” in the words of its spokesman Roger Lowe, and this week tapped Geoff Freeman, who runs the American Gaming Association, as its next CEO. The group will move from its downtown Washington headquarters into a smaller space across the river in the Rosslyn section of Arlington.

Members Find Fault With NFL’s New National Anthem Policy
New guidelines criticized from both sides

Rep. Keith Ellison, D-Minn., said he will boycott the NFL this season because of its policy fining players who kneel during the National Anthem. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Members of Congress found a partisan divide over the NFL’s new policy on players kneeling in protest during the national anthem.

The league announced last week that players who kneel during the anthem on the field would be fined, but they can stay in the locker room if they want to protest.

Emails Show Farenthold’s Pursuit of Lobbying Job
Disgraced former Texas congressman landed position shortly after leaving Congress

Rep. Blake Farenthold, R-Texas, appeared to have started angling for a new job within a few weeks of leaving the Hill. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Emails between former Rep. Blake Farenthold and his new employer show the disgraced Texas Republican was angling for a lobbying job shortly after resigning from Congress.

The emails obtained by the Dallas Morning News through an open records request showed Farenthold was pushing for an answer on the lobbying job with the port authority in his former district.

Sinema Breaks Record at ACLI Capital Challenge Race
Wisconsin Rep. Mike Gallagher is fastest member of Congress for second year in a row

Rep. Patrick T. McHenry, number 120, watches as Reps. Mike Gallagher and Kyrsten Sinema celebrate their victories at Wednesday’s ACLI Capital Challenge. (Bian Elkhatib/CQ Roll Call)

Updated 1:30 p.m. | Democratic Rep. Kyrsten Sinema of Arizona was the fastest female lawmaker and set a new course record for her division at the 37th annual ACLI Capital Challenge three-mile race Wednesday.

Sinema finished in 22 minutes and 3 seconds to break the course record of 22:41 held by former Republican Rep. Jean Schmidt of Ohio.

Members Dismiss Need for ‘Taxpayer-Funded Dorm’ in D.C.
Donovan says he would rather keep sleeping in his office rather than use taxpayer dollars

Rep. Dan Donovan, R-N.Y., said he doesn’t support a proposal to fund a facility for affordable housing for members of Congress in Washington. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

New York Rep. Dan Donovan said he opposes legislation to provide members with cheap housing as an alternative to sleeping in his office.

The Republican congressman was one of several members who spoke to the New York Post about legislation being proposed by Democratic Rep. Bennie Thompson.

Bishop Wants Answers on USDA Program That Kills Kittens
USDA disputes congressman’s estimate of cats used in ‘critical research’ of toxoplasmosis

Rep. Mike Bishop, R-Mich., wants answers on a program by the U.S. Department of Agriculture that he says led to the deaths of kittens. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Michigan Rep. Mike Bishop wants an investigation into the Department of Agriculture’s “secretive and problematic” experiments that have reportedly led to the deaths of hundreds of kittens.

Bishop sent a letter on Tuesday to Secretary Sonny Perdue about the cats’ treatment in the experiments, WTOP reported.

Pelosi Confident on Possible Speakership, Won’t Speculate on Minority Scenario
On some Democrats’ calls for new leadership: ‘If they have to do that to win the election, I’m all for winning’

“I can't even think of not winning” control of the House in November, House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, told a Washington audience on Tuesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi expressed confidence Tuesday in her ability to be elected speaker if Democrats retake the majority in November but wouldn’t say whether she’d stick around and run for minority leader if they fall short of that goal.

“I can’t even think of not winning,” the California Democrat said at a Politico Playbook event. “And you have to believe.”