ethics

Soto Takes Heat for Telling Puerto Rican Evacuees to Say They’re Staying
Evacuees should say they’re staying in Florida to access Medicare or Medicaid, South Florida Democrat says

Rep. Darren Soto, D-Fla., made waves over the weekend for comments to Puerto Rico hurricane evacuees. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A Florida Democrat caught heat over the weekend for telling a group of newly arrived hurricane evacuees from Puerto Rico to say they intend to stay in the state so that they can access health care benefits.

If the evacuees do not check that box on a federal form for Medicare and Medicaid, they will be ineligible to be recipients of those programs.

Inspired by #MeToo, Some Staffers Are Telling Congress’ Secrets
Beneficiaries of confidential settlements challenge code of silence

A former staff member of Oregon Rep. Greg Walden says he was inspired by the #MeToo movement to release documents outlining a $7,000 workplace discrimination and disability settlement with Walden’s office in 2014. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Cody Standiford is not exactly saying #MeToo.  He’s never been a victim of sexual misconduct.

But he may end up helping congressional staffers who have. The Iraq War veteran recently defied a legal agreement to shed light on how Congress handles harassment and discrimination complaints.

Former Rep. Mike Honda Might Run for San Jose Mayor
Lost re-election in 2016 against Rep. Ro Khanna

Former Rep. Mike Honda, D-Calif., said talk of him running for mayor in San Jose is “flattering.” (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Former California Rep. Mike Honda is considering running for mayor of San Jose after losing his seat in the House in 2016.

When asked whether he was considering running by the San Jose Mercury News, the Democrat said, “I’m not saying no.”

Opinion: The Perils of Impeachment
Democratic refrain may seem like shrill partisan rhetoric

Talk of impeachment seems as far from voter concerns as President Donald Trump’s TV viewing habits, Winston writes. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Washington is beginning to resemble a political version of TMZ — sensational headlines and “breaking news” alerts, blockbuster behind-the-scenes books that tell all or nothing depending on your point of view, and messy political divorces that rival Hollywood for backstabbing and jaw-dropping tweet wars.

On-air political interviews turn into verbal Ultimate Fighting Championship matches, and the media’s race to scoop the competition has further damaged the credibility of a profession already held in low esteem. This week kicked off with questions like “Will Oprah run?” and “Is Trump watching too much TV?”

Sherman Changes Office Policy After Staffer Accused of Harassment
New approach will have senior staffers ask junior ones of same gender if they’ve seen anything

Former aide Matt Dababneh, left, then a California state assemblyman, appears with Rep. Brad Sherman, D-Calif., at a town hall meeting last February. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images file photo)

California Rep. Brad Sherman said he would change his office’s policy on reporting sexual harassment following allegations against a former staffer.

Sherman’s former aide Matt Dababneh, who resigned from the California Assembly last month, faced multiple allegations of sexually harassing women while he worked in Sherman’s office.

Opinion: We’re a Long Way From White House Aides With a ‘Passion for Anonymity’
And what they’re saying about Trump isn’t pretty

One of the saddest aspects of President Donald Trump’s first year in office is the lack of interest by the Republican Congress in performing even the most rudimentary oversight of his presidency, Shapiro writes. (Win McNamee/Getty Images file photo)

Shortly after George Stephanopoulos published his critical 1999 memoir about the Clinton White House, “All Too Human,” I witnessed a fascinating impromptu debate about the propriety of a former aide dishing on an incumbent president.

The friendly antagonists were two towering figures from the Kennedy White House: Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Arthur Schlesinger and attorney Ted Sorensen, the greatest (“Ask not what your country can do for you ...”) presidential speechwriter in history.

Prosecutors Seek 30-Year Sentence for Doctor Tied to Menendez Case
Menendez awaiting word from DOJ on possible retrial for his own case

A friend of Sen. Bob Menendez, D-N.J., could face up to 30 years behind bars. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The Florida eye doctor tied to embattled Sen. Robert Menendez’s hung corruption trial could face up to 30 years in prison.

Salomon Melgen, a longtime friend of the New Jersey Democrat, was convicted last April of 67 crimes including health care fraud, submitting false claims and falsifying records while he snatched more than $100 million from the Medicare system as part of a massive fraud scheme.

Trump: Democrats Sabotaged Voting Fraud Panel
Critics have forcefully disputed Trump’s assertions, however

President Donald Trump delivers his address to a joint session of Congress last year. He started 2018 with an extended Twitter rant. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump is blaming his failed election fraud commission on Democratic-controlled state governments, and pushing an identification-based voting system from coast to coast.

After another wild day of Trump’s presidency, the White House on Wednesday night announced he had signed an executive order terminating the election fraud commission he established last year. In a statement, Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders blamed states for refusing to hand over data requested by the special panel.

Trump Terminates Election Fraud Commission
President cites states’ refusal to turn over data

The White House  blames states for refusing to turn over data to President Donald Trump’s election fraud commission. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump has signed an executive order terminating his election fraud commission. In a statement, White House spokeswoman Sarah Huckabee Sanders  blamed states’ refusal to turn over data to the special panel.

[Trump’s Voter Fraud Panel Remains Lightning Rod]

Trump Tower Meeting With Russian Was ‘Treasonous,’ Bannon Says
Former top Trump aide: Mueller probe focused on money laundering

Then-Republican Senate candidate Roy Moore is welcomed to the stage by Steve Bannon in an election eve rally in Fairhope, Alabama. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images file photo)

Former White House chief strategist Steve Bannon is calling a 2016 meeting between senior Trump campaign aides and a Russian lawyer they believed had dirt on Hillary Clinton “treasonous.”

In an interview for a coming book by Michael Wolff, Bannon slammed Donald Trump Jr., Jared Kushner (President Donald Trump’s son-in-law and a close campaign and White House adviser) and Paul Manafort (his campaign chairman at the time of the meeting who has been indicted by special counsel Robert Mueller).