gop-brand

Trump to ‘Sleepy Joe’ Biden: ‘I will see you at the Starting Gate!’
POTUS warns former VP that Democratic primary will be a ‘nasty’ fight

Then-Vice President Joe Biden speaks at the Georgetown Law School in Washington on March 23, 2016. He announced his third White House bid on Thursday. (Photo By Al Drago/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump has challenged former Vice President Joe Biden to a general election race, telling the former vice president hours after his presidential campaign announcement that he “will see you at the Starting Gate!”

The president appears to see Biden as a legitimate threat and has predicted that he and Vermont Independent Sen. Bernie Sanders will end up clashing for the Democratic nomination.

‘We’re fighting all the subpoenas,’ Trump says as war with Dems heats up
Neither side backing down in fight likely to spill into heart of 2020 election cycle

President Donald Trump, here at the White House on March 20, spoke to reporters as he departed for Atlanta on Wednesday. The president had been tweeting and criticizing Mueller report since its release, and threatened to fight subpoenas issued by House Democrats. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

House Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler’s subpoena of former White House counsel Don McGahn is “ridiculous,” President Donald Trump said Wednesday as Democrats continue their investigations of his business and political life.

The president also made clear that he and his legal team are dug in for what could be a protracted fight with House Democrats over their demands for witnesses to appear before several committees and requests for documents. Legal experts and political analysts already are predicting court battles and stall tactics that could last well into the 2020 election cycle.

Republicans have a post-Trump identity crisis on the horizon
What will it mean to be a Republican once the president leaves office?

Being a Republican has increasingly come to mean being with President Donald Trump, Gonzales writes, but it’s far from clear what the party will look like after he leaves office and if it will turn to Vice President Mike Pence for leadership. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Republicans are enjoying their ride in the White House and basking in the glow of a divided Democratic presidential field, but a monumental identity crisis is looming for the GOP.

Whether you think President Donald Trump won’t be president in two months, two years or six years, Republicans are going to have a difficult time moving on to the next chapter.

Will the White House or Trump’s lawyers block Don McGahn from testifying?
President’s team is examining case law for possible claim of executive privilege or immunity

The House Judiciary Committee has issued a subpoena for former White House Counsel Don McGahn to testify before the panel. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

White House officials have yet to determine whether they will exert executive privilege to block all or some of Don McGahn’s possible testimony to Congress, after Robert S. Mueller III’s report portrayed him as defying the president’s orders to hinder the special counsel’s investigation.

The report, released in redacted form last week, details several early instances when the White House counsel refused to follow through with President Donald Trump’s orders to remove Mueller. Trump has since criticized McGahn without naming him, and a decision on allowing him to appear before congressional panels — and how much he might be permitted to say — is still pending, White House aides say.

Could this be the primary where outside GOP groups help women win?
Female Republicans in North Carolina's 3rd District earn endorsements from super PACs

Voters in North Carolina’s 3rd District will pick their party nominees in the special election primary for the the late Rep. Walter B. Jones’ seat. Winners must clear 30 percent of the vote, or the top-two finishers will advance to a July runoff. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Republicans’ biggest problem electing women has been in primaries.

But in the first special election primary of the year, where 17 Republicans are vying next week for the nod in North Carolina’s 3rd District, the two candidates who have attracted the most significant outside support are women.

3 reasons why Trump dumped Herman Cain for Fed seat
‘I’m doing deals and I’m not being accommodated by the Fed,’ POTUS said last year

A man walks by the Marriner S. Eccles Federal Reserve Board Building in Washington, D.C.. Herman Cain will not get a Fed seat after all, President Trump announced Monday. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

In the end, not even Donald Trump and his sky-high popularity with the conservative wing of the Republican Party could give Herman Cain a new political life.

The president announced in a midday tweet that the former 2012 GOP presidential candidate would not get a nomination for a seat on the Federal Reserve.

Fact check: Trump focuses on ‘crimes,’ but impeachment is a political decision
Founders left it to Congress to define ‘high crimes and misdemeanors,’ scholars say

President Donald Trump and Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., follow Senate Sergeant-at-Arms Michael C. Stenger and House Sergeant-at-Arms Paul D. Irving down the House steps on March 14. Trump pushed back on impeachment talk Monday, saying it was the Democrats “that committed the crimes.” (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

ANALYSIS — Impeachment is very much on President Donald Trump’s mind even after he declared victory right as special counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s report was made public. But some of his arguments against it are contradicted by the former FBI director’s conclusions and legal scholars.

“Only high crimes and misdemeanors can lead to impeachment. There were no crimes by me (No Collusion, No Obstruction), so you can’t impeach,” the president tweeted Monday morning as the hashtag #ImpeachDonaldTrump was trending on Twitter in the United States. A few hours later, the president told reporters he was “not even a little bit” concerned about being impeached.

Sarah Sanders lashes out at Democrats, April Ryan over calls for her firing
Embattled Trump spokeswoman calls Dems' reaction to Mueller report ‘sad,’ wants to ‘move on’

White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders on Monday criticized author and journalist April Ryan, seen here at a book-launch event in September in New York, for calling for her ouster. The Mueller report detailed times in which Sanders lied to reporters, prompting Ryan's call. (Robin Marchant/Getty Images file photo)

Newly embattled White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders on Monday lashed out at congressional Democrats and reporter April Ryan as President Donald Trump and his team began their first week following release of Robert S. Mueller III’s report.

Democratic lawmakers wasted little time Thursday calling for her ouster following the special counsel’s report that detailed several instances in which Sanders misled reporters, especially about Trump’s decision-making before he fired then-FBI Director James Comey. Ryan, an American Urban Radio Networks reporter who provides analysis for CNN, followed that night by calling for the same during an appearance on the network’s “Outfront” program.

Trump feared ‘one of these independent counsels.’ He got something else
Amid Democrats’ criticism, is Barr trying to protect Trump or the office he occupies?

President Donald Trump was worried that “one of these independent counsels,” as Kenneth Starr was during the Clinton administration, would bring the “end of my presidency,” special counsel Robert S. Mueller III concluded in his report. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Jeff Sessions, then the attorney general, ended a phone call and returned to the Oval Office. It wasn’t long before President Donald Trump was in an angry rage.

Sessions, since unceremoniously fired, had just taken a phone call from Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, who informed him he had appointed former FBI Director Robert S. Mueller III as a special counsel to look into Russia’s 2016 election meddling, including whether there was coordination with Trump’s campaign.

Trump has been all over the place on ‘crazy’ Mueller report
President contends Donald McGahn’s damning notes ‘never existed until needed’

After calling the Mueller report "great" 25 days ago, President Donald Trump on Friday dubbed it "crazy." (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump on Friday broke his uncharacteristic silence about Special Counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s report, calling it “crazy” just 25 days after dubbing it “great.”

In a tweet from rainy Palm Beach, Fla., where he is spending a long Easter weekend at his Mar-a-Lago resort and nearby golf club, the commander in chief also lashed out — without naming him — at former White House counsel Donald McGahn, who offered Mueller’s team some of the most damning testimony about Trump and his chaotic West Wing.