immigration

Sessions: ‘Dreamers’ Fix Must Drive Down Illegal Immigration
AG has long opposed efforts to grant undocumented childhood immigrants legal status

Attorney General Jeff Sessions addressed immigration issues in testimony before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Wednesday. (Bill Clark/Roll Call)

Attorney General Jeff Sessions told senators Wednesday they could work with President Donald Trump to protect undocumented childhood immigrants from deportation as long as “amnesty” is coupled with efforts to reduce illegal immigration overall.

“The president has said he wants to work with Congress. He has a heart for young people,” Sessions told the Senate Judiciary Committee at a wide-ranging Justice Department oversight hearing.

Vulnerable Republicans Try to Navigate Immigration
Talks continue on how to address legal status of so-called Dreamers

Florida Rep. Carlos Curbelo says he is working on a bipartisan immigration bill. (Bill Clark/Roll Call)

What happens to undocumented immigrants brought to the United States as children is an issue that could loom large for several House Republicans facing tough re-election races next year.

Doing something to help those immigrants, also known as Dreamers, could win over some voters in their districts, especially Latinos. But that could also alienate Republican voters who want stricter immigration controls.

Why Trump’s Immigration Demands Haven’t Changed the Dynamics on Hill
Prospects for a bipartisan bill were already grim

A sign at an immigration rights protest in from on the White House on Sept. 5 to oppose President Donald Trump’s decision to phase out the DACA program. (Bill Clark/Roll Call File Photo)

President Donald Trump’s decision to push for his border wall as part of an immigration deal — after previously saying it would be dealt with separately — would, at first glance, seem to lower the probability of a bipartisan accord.

But the prospects were already grim. So Sunday’s release of Trump’s immigration policy priorities caused no major shift in the dynamics on Capitol Hill. 

Ai Weiwei Brings Politics, Humanity to ‘Human Flow’
Movie about refugees gets Republican and Democratic lawmakers to agree on something

Ai Weiwei’s film “Human Flow” traverses the globe to examine the refugee crisis. (Courtesy “Human Flow”)

Politics is seldom far removed from Ai Weiwei’s art, whether it comes in the form of a memorial to his dissident father, an iconic Olympics stadium in Beijing, Lego portraits of political prisoners or, in his latest venture, a documentary about refugees, “Human Flow.”

Aside from the accomplishment of shooting a movie in extremely dangerous locations across the globe about extremely desperate people, the artist has now been able to do that rarest of things for Washington: get a Republican and Democrat in the same room to agree on something.

Trump Tweet Shows How Tough an Immigration Deal Will Be
President claims Democrats ‘don’t want secure borders’

Senate Minority Leader Sen. Chuck Schumer, left, makes a point to President Donald Trump in the Oval Office as White House Director of Legislative Affairs Marc Short looks on at the end of a Sept. 6 meeting in which they struck a deal on government funding and the debt ceiling. A deal on immigration policy appears harder. (Alex Wong/Getty Images file photo)

President Donald Trump attacked congressional Democrats Tuesday morning, tweeting they “don’t want secure borders” and calling that the biggest hurdle that could sink efforts to craft an immigration bill.

The post on the president’s favorite social media site was part of an unusually early presidential Twitter storm that began shortly after 6 a.m. EDT — Trump’s morning tweets typically land between 7 a.m. and 9 a.m. In other tweets, Trump threatened the NFL and confirmed he will sign an executive order later this week that will terminate regulations put in place by Barack Obama’s 2010 health law.

White House Rolls Out Immigration Bill Demands but Top Democrats Object
List of asks closely aligns with Trump’s ‘America First’ philosophy

Immigration rights activists rally in Dupont Circle in Washington on May 1. The White House rolled out its demands for a broad immigration bill on Sunday night. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

The Trump administration on Sunday evening unveiled a sweeping list of demands for immigration overhaul legislation that Congress is slated to take up by early next year. But senior Democrats are already signaling the White House’s demands could sink any such bill.

Senior White House and administration officials told reporters on a hastily arranged call that President Donald Trump wants an immigration bill he set in motion last month to include funding for his proposed U.S.-Mexico border wall, provisions aimed at cracking down on the flow of minors from Central and South America, a new merit-based legal immigration system and changes to the federal grant program for so-called “sanctuary cities.”

This Senator Has Gotten Two Audiences with Trump in Four Days
Monday dinner focused on border security, immigration system changes

Sen. Tom Cotton boards a shuttle bus that transported senators to the White House on April 26. Cotton has met with President Donald Trump at the executive mansion twice this week. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

One lawmaker who could be crucial to Donald Trump’s goal of signing an immigration overhaul bill into law met twice with the president at the White House this week. But it wasn’t Speaker Paul D. Ryan or Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, or the chairmen of the House or Senate Homeland Security or Judiciary committees.

It wasn’t even Senate Majority Whip John Cornyn, perhaps the senior-most Republican senator with much at stake from an immigration bill since he represents Texas and its 1,240-mile border with Mexico. Rather, it was the relatively junior GOP senator who hails from thousands of miles from the border: Arkansas’s Tom Cotton.

Hunter Wants Pardon for Former Border Patrol Agents
Then-President Bush commuted their sentences before he left office

Rep. Duncan Hunter, R-Calif., said the two former Border Patrol agents have had trouble finding work because of their criminal records. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

California Rep. Duncan Hunterasked President Donald Trump to pardon two former Border Patrol agents who shot an unarmed marijuana smuggler at the Texas-Mexico border.

In a statement, Hunter said that the two agents Ignacio Ramos and Jose Compean shot the smuggler in the back after he was thought to be brandishing a weapon, the San Diego Union-Tribune reported.

Poll: Nearly 9 in 10 Americans Support a Program for Dreamers to Stay
Lawmakers working to find a solution by Trump’s deadline

Immigration rights demonstrators hold signs in front of the Trump International Hotel in Washington on Sept. 5 to oppose President Donald Trump’s decision to phase out the DACA program. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Nearly nine in 10 Americans support a program that allows undocumented childhood immigrants to remain in the United States, a Washington Post/ABC News poll found.

Eighty-six percent of respondents said they supported some kind of program for “undocumented immigrants to stay in the United States if they arrived here as a child, completed high school or military service and have not been convicted of a serious crime.”

Democrats May Sink FAA Extension, Hurricane Tax Relief Package
Minority support needed to pass measure under fast track procedure

Democratic Whip Steny H. Hoyer, D-Md., and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., oppose a GOP package to reauthorize the Federal Aviation Administration for six months and provide tax relief for hurricane victims. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Legislation that would reauthorize the Federal Aviation Administration for six months and provide tax relief to victims of recent hurricanes could fail on the House floor Monday evening amid Democratic opposition. 

The minority party’s support is needed to pass the measure under a fast-track procedure known as suspension of the rules. Two-thirds support is required for passage on the suspension calendar, meaning at least 50 Democrats would need to vote “yes” if all 240 Republicans support the legislation.