impeachment

Trump: ‘It doesn’t matter what I discussed’ on call that drew whistleblower’s complaint
President announces sanctions at the ‘highest level’ against Iran after strike against Saudi oil facility

President Donald Trump is mired in another crisis, this time over an allegation he made a troubling “promise” to another world leader. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images file photo)

President Donald Trump on Friday did not deny discussing former Vice President Joe Biden with his Ukranian counterpart during a telephone conversation that reportedly prompted an intelligence community whistleblower to file a formal complaint.

“It doesn’t matter what I discussed,” Trump told reporters Friday, according to a pool report. The ever defiant president then ran toward the controversy, saying, “Someone ought to look into Joe Biden.”

Democrats say they want to prioritize legislation over impeachment. Here’s their chance
Thursday release of prescription drug pricing bill provides opportunity for messaging shift

House Democratic Caucus Vice Chairwoman Katherine M. Clark and Caucus Chairman Hakeem Jeffries say House Democrats are most successful in communicating their policy messages directly to constituents in their districts. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

House Democratic leaders’ plan to release a top-priority prescription drug pricing bill on Thursday presents the caucus with an opportunity to refocus its messaging on legislating over investigating — one that many Democrats say is desperately needed.

Moderate Democrats in particular are concerned that the caucus’s policy work isn’t breaking through the impeachment cloud that has overshadowed the 116th Congress.

Corey Lewandowski teases Senate run as he testifies before Judiciary Committee
Former Trump campaign manager appeared to relish spotlight in impeachment hearing

Corey Lewandowski, the former campaign manager for President Donald Trump, tweeted a link to a potential campaign website during the first break in his testimony before the House Judiciary Committee on Tuesday. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

Frustrating the Democrats and proving loyalty to President Donald Trump: That’s just good politics for a Republican.

At least that’s what former Trump campaign manager Corey Lewandowski appeared to be banking on Tuesday as he testified before the House Judiciary Committee and continued to tease a possible bid for Senate from New Hampshire.

First impeachment hearing becomes test of Judiciary Committee sway
Hearing looks unlikely to produce much, other than once again demonstrating White House resistance to congressional oversight

Corey Lewandowski, former campaign manager for President Donald Trump, testifies before the House Judiciary Committee on Tuesday. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

House Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler launched a series of hearings Tuesday highlighting President Donald Trump’s actions to educate the public and other lawmakers on reasons for impeachment — but the witnesses and the White House had other plans.

Two of the three witnesses don’t plan to show up on the orders of the White House, part of the Trump administration’s fight-all-the-subpoenas approach that leaves the committee to either file lawsuits to enforce the subpoenas or hold the witnesses in contempt.

Nadler revs up Trump inquiry
Lewandowski scheduled Tuesday; no time for probe of Kavanaugh

House Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., said his committee could not prioritize an investigation into Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Former Trump campaign manager Corey Lewandowski is scheduled to testify at an impeachment hearing before the House Judiciary Committee on Tuesday, but Chairman Jerrold Nadler expects he will try to “improperly exert” executive privilege on some questions.

Lewandowski — the scheduled star witness at the committee’s first hearing related to its impeachment inquiry of President Donald Trump — played a lead role in an episode laid out in special counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s report on the president’s efforts to interfere in the investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential election.

Photos of the Week: They’re Back!
The week of September 13 as captured by Roll Call’s photojournalists

Over the August recess, the Ohio Clock’s two arms were returned to full working order. Meanwhile, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., returned to Washington with just one working arm after breaking his shoulder at his home in Kentucky. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Judiciary ranking member Doug Collins compares committee’s work to an Instagram filter

Ranking member Rep. Doug Collins, R-Ga., speaks at a House Judiciary Committee hearing in July 2019. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Pelosi on Trump investigations: ‘We are, from a timing standpoint, where we need to be’
Speaker still refuses to clarify whether she thinks it’s appropriate to call the investigations an impeachment inquiry

Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., won’t call Democrats’ investigations into President Donald Trump an impeachment inquiry, but says timing-wise they're where they need to be. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Speaker Nancy Pelosi on Thursday again declined to say whether she thinks House Democrats’ investigations into President Donald Trump are a formal impeachment inquiry, but she said the probe is proceeding on track. 

“I’m very pleased [with] the path we’re on and the progress we’ve made,” the California Democrat said. “We are, from a timing standpoint, where we need to be.”

Capitol Ink | Mixed Messages

Hoyer contradicts Judiciary Committee on impeachment inquiry

House Majority Leader Steny H. Hoyer, D-Md., contradicted Democrats on the Judiciary Committee when he said Wednesday the panel was not engaged in an impeachment inquiry. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Updated 1:23 p.m. | House Majority Leader Steny H. Hoyer on Wednesday directly contradicted Judiciary Committee Democrats’ assertion that they’re engaged in an impeachment inquiry.

“No,” the Maryland Democrat told reporters during his weekly press briefing when asked if he thought an impeachment inquiry was underway. “I think the delineation ought to be whether or not they’re considering a resolution of impeachment.”