legal-affairs

Trump to ‘Sleepy Joe’ Biden: ‘I will see you at the Starting Gate!’
POTUS warns former VP that Democratic primary will be a ‘nasty’ fight

Then-Vice President Joe Biden speaks at the Georgetown Law School in Washington on March 23, 2016. He announced his third White House bid on Thursday. (Photo By Al Drago/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump has challenged former Vice President Joe Biden to a general election race, telling the former vice president hours after his presidential campaign announcement that he “will see you at the Starting Gate!”

The president appears to see Biden as a legitimate threat and has predicted that he and Vermont Independent Sen. Bernie Sanders will end up clashing for the Democratic nomination.

Women share pride in Eleanor Holmes Norton dedication at Georgetown Law
Friends and supporters laud D.C. delegate’s role in ‘civil rights and women’s rights and D.C. rights’

Breaking ground on the Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton Green and monument at Georgetown Law Center are, from left, D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser; Georgetown Law Center Dean William Treanor; Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, D-D.C.; Rep. Jamie Raskin, D-Md.; and Georgetown President John DeGioia. (Clyde McGrady/CQ Roll Call)

The Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton Green at Georgetown University Law Center is a point of pride for the women in attendance for its groundbreaking Tuesday.

Surrounded by her children, grandchildren, colleagues and friends among the 150 supporters beneath a white reception tent on the law center’s green, Norton, 81, basked in the honor and recounted the civil rights and feminist battles fought during her time in and out of office.

‘We’re fighting all the subpoenas,’ Trump says as war with Dems heats up
Neither side backing down in fight likely to spill into heart of 2020 election cycle

President Donald Trump, here at the White House on March 20, spoke to reporters as he departed for Atlanta on Wednesday. The president had been tweeting and criticizing Mueller report since its release, and threatened to fight subpoenas issued by House Democrats. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

House Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler’s subpoena of former White House counsel Don McGahn is “ridiculous,” President Donald Trump said Wednesday as Democrats continue their investigations of his business and political life.

The president also made clear that he and his legal team are dug in for what could be a protracted fight with House Democrats over their demands for witnesses to appear before several committees and requests for documents. Legal experts and political analysts already are predicting court battles and stall tactics that could last well into the 2020 election cycle.

Mnuchin misses Trump tax returns deadline; asks for more time
Noncompliance with Democrats’ request could put Treasury secretary in jeopardy, legal experts say

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin says “exposure for the sake of exposure” is not a valid reason for House Democrats seeking the president’s tax returns. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Updated 6:12 p.m. | Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said Tuesday he will make a determination by May 6 on whether to comply with House Ways and Means Chairman Richard E. Neal’s request for six years of President Donald Trump’s tax returns.

Neal had set a 5 p.m. deadline Tuesday for the administration to comply with his request. The Treasury Department announced shortly after the deadline that Mnuchin had sent a 10-page response to the Massachusetts Democrat’s request.

Will the White House or Trump’s lawyers block Don McGahn from testifying?
President’s team is examining case law for possible claim of executive privilege or immunity

The House Judiciary Committee has issued a subpoena for former White House Counsel Don McGahn to testify before the panel. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

White House officials have yet to determine whether they will exert executive privilege to block all or some of Don McGahn’s possible testimony to Congress, after Robert S. Mueller III’s report portrayed him as defying the president’s orders to hinder the special counsel’s investigation.

The report, released in redacted form last week, details several early instances when the White House counsel refused to follow through with President Donald Trump’s orders to remove Mueller. Trump has since criticized McGahn without naming him, and a decision on allowing him to appear before congressional panels — and how much he might be permitted to say — is still pending, White House aides say.

Justices ask in Census case: ‘Congress is silent. Should the court then step in?’
Conservative majority appears ready to let citizenship question stand

Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross testifies during a House Oversight and Reform Committee hearing in Rayburn Building to discuss preparations for the 2020 Census and citizenship questions on March 14, 2019. The Census case was argued in front of the Supreme Court on April 23. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The House came to the Supreme Court to argue against the Trump administration’s plan to add a citizenship question to the 2020 Census — and ended up getting quizzed about why lawmakers didn’t take their own action if they wanted to stop it.

In about 90 minutes of lively questioning Tuesday, the conservative majority of the court appeared ready to defer to Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross’ decision to add the question even though it could reduce census responses among noncitizen households.

Trump attacks media, says N.Y. Times should ‘beg for forgiveness’
After relative silence post-Mueller report, president explodes with two-hour Twitter rant

President Donald Trump speaks to the media before departing from the White House on March 8. On Tuesday morning, he went on a two-hour Twitter rant to blast the media. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images file photo)

After days of media coverage describing the White House portrayed in special counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s report as rife with dysfunction and ignored presidential orders, Donald Trump on Tuesday lambasted those who cover him.

He even suggested one of his top media targets, The New York Times, should “get down on their knees & beg for forgiveness.”

House Democrats start following Mueller’s leads as they investigate Trump
Immediate strategy is continuing their probes, but calls for impeachment growing in caucus

Speaker Nancy Pelosi has urged caution on talk about impeaching President Donald Trump, but many in her caucus feel differently. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Democrats are starting to follow leads laid out in special counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s report as their own investigations into President Donald Trump continue. 

The caucus held a conference call Monday evening in which the six committee chairs who are investigating various matters involving Trump updated members on their next steps now that Mueller has concluded his investigation. Details shared with Roll Call were provided by people on the call who were not authorized to publicly disclose contents of the private caucus discussion.

Fact check: Trump focuses on ‘crimes,’ but impeachment is a political decision
Founders left it to Congress to define ‘high crimes and misdemeanors,’ scholars say

President Donald Trump and Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., follow Senate Sergeant-at-Arms Michael C. Stenger and House Sergeant-at-Arms Paul D. Irving down the House steps on March 14. Trump pushed back on impeachment talk Monday, saying it was the Democrats “that committed the crimes.” (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

ANALYSIS — Impeachment is very much on President Donald Trump’s mind even after he declared victory right as special counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s report was made public. But some of his arguments against it are contradicted by the former FBI director’s conclusions and legal scholars.

“Only high crimes and misdemeanors can lead to impeachment. There were no crimes by me (No Collusion, No Obstruction), so you can’t impeach,” the president tweeted Monday morning as the hashtag #ImpeachDonaldTrump was trending on Twitter in the United States. A few hours later, the president told reporters he was “not even a little bit” concerned about being impeached.

Jason Crow has the Monday of all Mondays
Members of Congress: They’re just like us

Democratic Rep. Jason Crow is performing his civic duty back home in Colorado today. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Updated 1:25 p.m. | Just when you thought Monday couldn’t get any more Monday, Rep. Jason Crow had to find out the hard way how Monday-y this Monday could get. The Democratic congressman was called to fulfill his civic duty this morning at Adams County Court in Brighton, Colorado.