legal-affairs

3 Reasons Why Manafort Jurors Are Still Deliberating
Deliberations in trial of ex-Trump campaign aide will pick up again Monday

A protester is seen on July 31 outside the United States District Court in Alexandria, Va., where President Donald Trump’s former campaign chairman Paul Manafort is standing trial. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The trial of former Trump presidential campaign manager Paul Manafort will continue next week after the judge dismissed jurors early Friday before they could issue a verdict.

The jury has now spent two days deliberating whether Manafort is guilty or innocent on none, some or all of the 18 counts of tax evasion and bank fraud he faces.

Manafort Trial Likely to Go Into Next Week
Jurors asked judge to be released at 5 p.m.

Jurors have deliberated for two days on the 18 bank fraud and tax evasion charges against former Donald Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort, shown leaving a hearing on his bail last year. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The trial of former Donald Trump presidential campaign manager Paul Manafort is likely to go into next week after the judge announced that jurors asked to leave Friday at 5 p.m.

Jurors asked shortly before 3 p.m. Eastern time that they be allowed to leave so one of them could attend “an event,” Judge T.S. Ellis III said. The announcement suggests that the jury is not close to reaching a verdict on the 18 bank fraud and tax evasion charges Manafort is being tried on.

Manafort Judge Says He’s Getting Death Threats
Judge T.S. Ellis III says he won’t reveal jurors information to prevent them from getting similar threats

The media set up microphones on July 31 in front of the United States District Court in Alexandria, Va., where President Donald Trump’s former campaign chairman Paul Manafort was standing trial. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Updated 3:36 p.m. | The judge presiding over the trial of former Trump presidential campaign chairman Paul Manafort will not release the names and addresses of jurors to prevent exposing them to threats similar to what he has received, he said Friday.

Judge T.S. Ellis III said he has received death threats during the proceedings over the last few weeks and has had a U.S. marshals detail following him at all times.

Manafort Jury Stuck on Foreign Accounts, ‘Reasonable Doubt’
Jurors had four questions for judge Thursday

A protester stands outside the United States District Court on July 31 in Alexandria, Va., where President Donald Trump’s former campaign chairman Paul Manafort is standing trial. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call file photo)

After roughly seven hours of deliberation Thursday, the six men and six women on the jury deciding the fate of former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort will require at least another day to hand down their verdict.

At approximately 5:06 p.m., Judge T.S. Ellis III read a handwritten note from the jury with four questions. One of the questions referred to the requirements for people filing reports of foreign bank and financial accounts, or FBARs. Another asked the judge to redefine “reasonable doubt.”

Senate Democrats ‘Ready to Sue’ for Kavanaugh Records
Schumer threatens lawsuit against the National Archives

Sen. Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn., holds up a letter signed by Senate Judiciary Democrats to the National Archives requesting documents related to Judge Brett Kavanaugh during the Senate Democrats' media availability in the Capitol on Thursday. Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., is in the background. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer and Democrats threatened Thursday to file a lawsuit to get access to documents from Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh’s time in the George W. Bush White House.

Schumer told reporters that Judiciary Committee Democrats “stand ready to sue” the National Archives and Records Administration if they don’t quickly fill requests from committee Democrats for records under the Freedom of Information Act. The confirmation hearing for Kavanaugh is set for Sept. 4, and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has said he wants a floor vote before Oct. 1.

3 Key Points in Manafort Defense’s Closing Argument
Prosecutors bear the burden of proof in the U.S., Manafort’s lawyers remind jury

Former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort, here in November 2017, faces up to 305 years in prison if the Eastern Virginia jury finds his guilty on all charges. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Paul Manafort’s lawyers presented their final argument Wednesday, defending the former Trump campaign chairman from 18 charges of tax evasion, bank fraud, and bank fraud conspiracy.

Manafort faces up to 305 years in prison if the Eastern Virginia jury finds him guilty on all charges.

Kavanaugh Makes Strategic Stops on His Senate Tour as Chamber Returns
Heitkamp, Donnelly and other swing votes are on his schedule

Sens. Heidi Heitkamp, D-N.D., and Joe Donnelly, D-Ind., are among those expected to meet with Trump’s Supreme Court pick. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh will ramp up his behind-the-scenes preparation over the next three weeks for his confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee, starting with more one-on-one meetings Wednesday with senators whose votes could prove pivotal.

Kavanaugh, who is more used to asking questions from the dais as a judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit for the past 12 years, has been going through mock hearings that last several hours with questions from people assigned to the role of different senators, a White House official said.

Manafort Prosecution Comes Down to Three Key Points
Prosecutors present closing argument in former Trump campaign manager’s tax evasion trial

Kevin Downing, left, attorney for former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort, and members of the defense team arrive at the Albert V. Bryan United States Courthouse on Wednesday as both sides were expected to present their closing arguments. (Win McNamee/Getty Images)

Special counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s prosecution team delivered its closing argument in the tax evasion and bank fraud trial of former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort on Wednesday.

Manafort faces a maximum 305-year prison sentence if the Eastern Virginia jury finds him guilty on all 18 charges.

Closing Arguments for Manafort Trial Set for Wednesday, if Jurors Can ‘Pay Attention’
Jury could decide former Trump campaign chairman’s fate as early as that evening

The closing arguments for the trial against former Donald Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort are set for Wednesday. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call)

Closing arguments for the Paul Manafort trial are set to begin Wednesday morning, Judge T.S. Ellis III said in court Tuesday.

The Eastern Virginia jury could decide as early as Wednesday evening whether the former Trump campaign chairman is guilty of any of the 18 counts he is facing on tax evasion and bank fraud.

3 Takeaways as Prosecution Rests Case in Paul Manafort Trial
Trial has put potential tax reporting loophole under the microscope

Media outlets set up microphones on July 31 in front of the United States District Court in Alexandria, Va., where President Donald Trump’s former campaign chairman, Paul Manafort, is standing trial. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call)

Special counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s prosecution team on Monday rested its case against former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort, wrapping up its evidence and witness testimony in just 10 days.

The defense will decide whether it will call any witnesses Tuesday morning. If it does not, both sides are expected to deliver closing arguments. Then the jury will decide Manafort’s fate.