media

Senate Periodical Press Gallery loses a familiar face
Deputy Director Shawna Blair departs after 14 years

Shawna Blair of the Senate Periodical Press Gallery, center, holds her dog George Clooney, in the Capitol's Senate Daily Press Gallery in 2015. Appearing in the background, from left, are Tricia Munro of the Senate Press Photographers' Gallery, Laura Lytle and Beth Crowley, both of the Senate Press Gallery and Bloomberg News' Kate Hunter, right. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

After helping coordinate three presidential inaugurations, eight presidential conventions, five Supreme Court nominations and answering more than a decade of reporter questions, a familiar face will no longer be in the Senate Periodical Press Gallery.

Shawna Blair, the gallery’s deputy director, worked her final day in the gallery Wednesday after about 14 years there. On Monday, she starts her new gig as communications director for the Delta Regional Authority.

California ice cream shop milks D.C. impeachment hearings
I scream, you scream for “Im-peach-mint Pie” ice cream?

California-based Smitten Ice Cream debuts "Im-Peach-Mint Pie" flavor in light of Washington's impeachment hearings (Courtesy Smitten Ice Cream)

You can run, but you can’t hide from the buzz that continuously surrounds congressional testimonies — even if you mute your Twitter notifications.

The House impeachment hearings continue to inspire clever cocktails around D.C. such as the “Quit Bro, Go” at Capitol Lounge and “Impeachment Please” at Union Pub.

Watch: Trump live tweets impeachment hearing, Yovanovitch reacts in real time
President attacks ousted Ukraine ambassador as she testifies

Former U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine Marie Yovanovitch testifies during the House Select Intelligence Committee hearing on the impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump on Friday. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

Rep. Adam B. Schiff read aloud a tweet sent by President Donald Trump attacking Marie Yovanovitch during her testimony during the House impeachment hearing on Friday.

Impeachment news roundup: Nov. 15
Ousted ambassador to Ukraine defends herself against ‘smear campaign,’ Trump attacks her during testimony

Former U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine Marie Yovanovitch testifies during the House Intelligence Committee hearing on the impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump on Friday. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

Marie Yovanovitch, the former U.S. ambassador to Ukraine who was removed from her post by President Donald Trump, spent much of her opening statement before the House Intelligence Committee on Friday dismissing allegations that she worked against the president while in her post in Kyiv.

[Former ambassador to Ukraine talks of Foreign Service ‘degradation’ under Trump]

Kennedy calls for removal of VH1 series ‘Cartel Crew’
In letter, Louisiana senator says reality show is ’glorifying a brutal, deadly lifestyle’

Sen. John Kennedy, R-La., sent a letter to VH1 requesting the cancellation of “Cartel Crew.” (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A 67-year-old senator isn’t the first person that comes to mind when one thinks about “reality TV” backlash, but at the tail end of 2019, weirder things have happened.

Sen. John Kennedy’s office released a letter Thursday asking VH1 to cancel “Cartel Crew,” a show that follows the journeys of relatives of cartel members who “set out to live legit lives and make names for themselves outside of the drug world,” according to the show’s website.

Impeachment news roundup: Nov. 14
Each side’s impeachment strategy emerges in first day of hearings; Pelosi invites Trump to testify

Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, and other House Republicans conduct a news conference after the first day of impeachment inquiry public hearings on Wednesday. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

Two central figures in the new evidence linking President Donald Trump more closely to the U.S.’s request for Ukraine to investigate the president’s political rivals are scheduled to testify before lawmakers in the coming days.

Acting Ambassador to Ukraine Bill Taylor told lawmakers in the first public hearing in the impeachment inquiry on Wednesday that one of his aides overheard Trump asking Ambassador to the E.U. Gordon Sondland over the phone about the status of “the investigations” just a day after his July 25 phone call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy.

Capitol Ink | Front Row Seat

Impeachment news roundup: Nov. 13
Two career diplomats first to offer public testimony, Trump tweets counteroffensive

William Taylor, the senior U.S. diplomat in Ukraine, and George Kent, deputy assistant secretary for European and Eurasian Affairs, are sworn in at the House Intelligence Committee hearing. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Two career diplomats who told congressional investigators behind closed doors of their concerns over President Donald Trump’s withholding of military aid to Ukraine and the “irregular channel” in dealing with the country conducted by Trump’s personal attorney Rudy Giuliani testified today in the first public hearings in the House’s impeachment investigation.

William Taylor, the acting U.S. ambassador to Ukraine, told investigators in a closed-door deposition in October that Trump used a stalled $400 million aid package to leverage Ukraine President Volodymyr Zelenskiy to investigate former Vice President Joe Biden and the involvement of his son Hunter Biden in a Ukrainian energy company. And George Kent, the deputy assistant secretary of State for European and Eurasian Affairs, told the committees conducting the investigation in his closed-door deposition that it was his understanding that Trump wanted the Ukrainians to investigate the Bidens and whether the country tried to influence the 2016 election.

Capitol Ink | More talking points

Progressives are going to have to pick: Sanders or Warren?
Warren‘s a front-runner, but Sanders is a man on a mission

Sens. Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren are battling for the left in the Democratic presidential primary. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

ANALYSIS — Only a few months from now, populist Democratic progressives around the country hoping to elect one of their own to the White House will need to choose between Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders and Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren.

Do they back the angry Democratic socialist, or the feisty, anti-corporate populist who wants to break up the banks and big tech companies? One says he is trying to lead a revolution. The other calls for dramatic change, often dismissing critics in her own party for regurgitating Republican talking points.