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How Vulnerable is Deb Fischer in Nebraska?
Race still ‘Solid Republican’ at this point

The burden of proof is still on Democrats to demonstrate that a challenge to Sen. Deb Fischer, R-Neb., is a serious takeover opportunity, Nathan L. Gonzales writes. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Nebraska has been dubbed a “sleeper” Senate race and rated as competitive by some handicappers. House Democrats just came close to winning a special election in a congressional district President Donald Trump won by 21 points, so how vulnerable is GOP Sen. Deb Fischer?

At a minimum, the senator faces a spirited challenge from Lincoln City Council member Jane Raybould. But the perception that Nebraska is a legitimate Democratic takeover opportunity seems to lean on the proclamation that no Republican seat is safe and limited public polling. Other evidence, including previously unreleased polling from the Fischer campaign, paints a different picture of the race.

Republican Debbie Lesko Wins Arizona Special Election
Victory keeps seat in GOP hands but margin could give Democrats hope

Former state Sen. Debbie Lesko is heading to Congress after winning the special election in Arizona’s 8th District. (Courtesy Debbie Lesko/Flickr)

Updated Wednesday, 12:04 a.m. | Former Republican state Sen. Debbie Lesko won the special election in Arizona’s 8th District on Tuesday night, but her victory margin for a seat that President Donald Trump easily carried in 2016 appeared to be relatively slim.

The Associated Press called the race with Lesko leading Democrat Hiral Tipirneni, 53 percent to 47 percent in early ballots, which accounted for an estimated 75 percent of the total votes cast, according to the Arizona secretary of state’s office. The seat opened up after former GOP Rep. Trent Franks resigned in December amid allegations of sexual misconduct.

Trump Prepared to Strike Assad Again, Official Says
Aides contradict president’s ‘Mission accomplished!’ declaration

President Donald Trump would strike Syria again if Friday night’s missile strikes fail to prevent its government from again using chemical weapons. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

Updated 2:54 p.m. | President Donald Trump is prepared to again strike Syria if its president, Bashar Assad, launches another chemical weapons attack, a senior administration official said Saturday.

“If this act does not succeed, we will act again,” the senior official said, referring to Friday night’s cruise missile strikes on Syrian government targets.

Podcast: Pentagon Reluctant to Enter Syrian War
CQ on Congress, Episode 98

Chairman Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., escorts Secretary of Defense nominee James Mattis to the hearing room for his confirmation hearing in the Senate Armed Services Committee on Thursday, Jan. 12, 2017. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Podcast: Paul Ryan Departure Leaves GOP Spinning
Political Theater, Episode 14

Speaker of the House Paul D. Ryan, R-Wis., arrives for a press conference to announce his won't seek re-election on Wednesday, April 11, 2018. Press Secretary Ash Lee Strong leads the way. Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call

Wanted: Prolific Fundraiser to Boost House GOP After Ryan Exits
Speaker’s retirement announcement sparks scramble to find a donor-friendly successor

House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., and House Majority Whip Steve Scalise, R-La., arrive in the basement of the Capitol as reports of Speaker Paul Ryan not running for re-election spread on Wednesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Speaker Paul D. Ryan’s retirement announcement Wednesday sparked a public scramble for a successor to match his fundraising prowess and to serve as the House GOP’s political and policy chief in the age of President Donald Trump.

Though the Wisconsin lawmaker has pledged to stay in office through the end of the term in early January 2019, some GOP insiders on and off the Hill question whether he can remain an effective fundraiser and political leader during a nearly nine-month lame-duck period.

Senators Face Off With Zuckerberg in Marathon Hearing
Joint hearing starts off with pop, brings unexpected questions, and then gradually fades

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg testified during the Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee and Senate Judiciary Committee joint hearing Tuesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

“Mr. Zuckerberg, would you be comfortable sharing with us the name of the hotel you stayed in last night?”

Senate Minority Whip Richard J. Durbin asked that of Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg nearly two hours into Tuesday afternoon’s headline-grabbing Senate hearing.

Zuckerberg Vows to Step Up Security at Expense of Facebook’s Profits
Social media CEO plans to say ‘I’m sorry’ during House testimony

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg sits in the waiting area of Sen. Bill Nelson’s office in the Hart Building before their meeting on Monday. Zuckerberg is on Capitol Hill to testify before the House and Senate this week. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Facebook founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg will tell lawmakers this week that the social media company plans to significantly increase spending on security even at the cost of its bottom line to prevent the kinds of data leaks and manipulation by fake accounts that have dogged the company in the past two years.

“I’ve directed our teams to invest so much in security — on top of the other investments we’re making — that it will significantly impact our profitability,” Zuckerberg plans to tell Congress, according to his prepared remarks made public by the House Energy and Commerce Committee on Monday. “But I want to be clear about what our priority is: protecting our community is more important than maximizing our profits.”

Podcast: How Congress Could Force Facebook to Strengthen Data Privacy
CQ on Congress, Episode 97

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg faces a grilling in Congress next week.  Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

 

The Legacy of Martin Luther King Jr. in Images
50 years since his death, the visual influence of the civil rights leader

Journee Guadalupe of Woodbridge, Va., takes a picture of the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial in Washington in August 2011. (Tom Williams/Roll Call file photo)

As the country marks the 50th anniversary of the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr., the civil rights leader’s legacy is one spread throughout the nation, from the monument to King on Independence Avenue in D.C., to quieter marks of his influence throughout the country.

D.C. Residents and Visitors Remember MLK Jr. 50 Years Later