DEFN

Mueller report’s second act: congressional scrutiny
CQ on Congress podcast, Episode 149

Pages of special counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s report on Russian interference in the 2016 election, which was printed out by House Judiciary staffers on Thursday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

CQ legal affairs reporter Todd Ruger says House Democrats now have plenty of leads from special counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s report to investigate, especially as to whether President Donald Trump sought to obstruct justice.

Show Notes:

The Mueller report is exactly as long as Kim Kardashian’s coffee table book
The special counsel and the reality star both love the number 448. The similarities are uncanny

Kim Kardashian is studying to be a lawyer. (JP Yim/Getty Images)

With all of the heated discussion surrounding the release of today’s Mueller report (and I know what you’re thinking, “What Mueller report?”), I can’t help but notice one thing that’s been redacted (see what I did there?) from the conversation: the ungodly amount of pages in this thing.Now, I’d like to wishfully think that minimal paper has been wasted, since the report was delivered on a CD — because today is Thursday, after all, and apparently we’re throwing it back to 1997. But 448 pages? Random, right?

Not so much. It turns out Robert Mueller isn’t the only law enthusiast who’s penned a literary work (of sorts) at this length. 

What happened when I went to a baseball game instead of reading the Mueller report
Some in Washington scrambled. Others spent the day eating Dippin’ Dots

Something happened in Washington on Thursday: the Nats played the Giants. Above, fans pose for photos with George Washington in the stands at Nationals Park in 2017. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

You didn’t have to venture far from the Capitol on Thursday to find a crowd of Washingtonians who weren’t overwhelmed by the Mueller report.

Patrick Corbin, the newest Nationals star starting pitcher, took the mound a little after 1 p.m., before key Democrats like House Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler or Senate Intelligence Vice Chairman Mark Warner had even weighed in on the substance of the report.

Mueller report shows Trump aides routinely ignored his orders on crucial matters
Special counsel highlights chaotic West Wing where staff tried to save president from himself

President Donald Trump's top aides routinely ignored his orders on crucial legal matters during his first year in office, according to special counsel Robert S. Mueller III. (Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Presidential orders given but often ignored. Ample cursing. Aides working behind the scenes to protect Donald Trump from his own anger and impulsiveness. And an effort to prevent the president from firing special counsel Robert S. Mueller III despite his determination to do so.

Mueller’s long-anticipated report reveals a chaotic West Wing driven by paranoia and frequent outbursts from a green president who wanted to remove the special counsel and demanded that his attorney general, Jeff Sessions, be more like predecessors Robert F. Kennedy and Eric H. Holder Jr., whom he felt “protected” the respective presidents they served, John F. Kennedy and Barack Obama.

Mueller report is a reminder that Russian hack hit House races, too
Talks between the DCCC and NRCC about using stolen information stalled in September

The Justice Department on Thursday released special counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s report on Russian interference in the 2016 election. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Special counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s report provided new details Thursday about how Russian agents hacked into Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee computers in 2016, renewing the question of whether the two parties would agree not to use stolen material in future political attacks.

Leaders of the DCCC and the National Republican Congressional Committee came close to such an an agreement in late 2018, but talks broke down.

Democratic 2020 hopefuls aim political firepower on Barr
California’s Eric Swalwell calls for Barr to resign over handling of Mueller report

California Rep. Eric Swalwell has called for Attorney General William Barr to resign. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Democrats looking to succeed President Donald Trump picked up a new target on Thursday: Attorney General William Barr. 

As 2020 candidates continued to read a redacted copy of special counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s full report into Russian interference in the 2016 election, it was Barr — as much as Trump — who was in the crosshairs in the hours after the report’s release.

Hey! Robert Mueller relies on CQ
CQ’s transcript service shows up in at least 16 pages of footnotes in Mueller report

Members of the media film a few pages of special counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s report on Russian interference in the 2016 election, which was printed out by House Judiciary staffers on Thursday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Who are you going to call when you need a transcript for official citation in the Mueller report? Why, CQ, of course.

The highly anticipated report by special counsel Robert S. Mueller III released Thursday spans nearly 450 pages, but tucked in the footnotes of at least 16 of them is text from transcripts that are available through CQ.

One thing Barr didn’t redact: the f-bomb
The attorney general and his team blacked out many a word, but they let obscenities stand

President Donald Trump had some choice words for the special counsel’s Russia investigation, the redacted report reveals. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The special counsel’s report may be groaning with redactions, but there’s one thing the Justice Department didn’t blot out — profanity.

That’s right, we’re talking f-bombs, bastards and your garden-variety bullshit.

House Democrats press on with investigations after Mueller report release
They’re dissatisfied with how much information was redacted from special counsel’s report

Rep. Adam B. Schiff, chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, still wants “comprehensive testimony from Special Counsel Robert S. Mueller’s Russia investigation. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump might be claiming vindication with the release of special counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s Russia report, but House Democrats are moving forward with their investigations of him and people in his orbit.

Democrats quickly expressed their dissatisfaction with how much information Attorney General William Barr redacted from the report released Thursday.

Nadler to subpoena the unredacted Mueller report and underlying materials
Judiciary chairman says contrary to public reports he has not heard that DOJ plans to provide a less-redacted version

House Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., said he will issue a subpoena for the full, unredacted version of the Mueller report and the underlying investigatory materials. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler is officially issuing a subpoena to obtain the full, unredacted report authored by special counsel Robert S. Mueller III, and the underlying materials used in his investigation.

Just a few hours after the Department of Justice released a redacted version of Mueller’s report to Congress and the public, Nadler said he will issue a subpoena for the full report and investigatory materials. The Judiciary Committee had voted to authorize him to do so earlier this month, and the chairman had said he would if the Department of Justice declined to willingly provide the full report to Congress.