EXBR

Facebook feud: GOP Rep. Peter King, faces lawsuit threat over blocking constituents
The New York Civil Liberties Union said it plans to sue King if he does not unblock roughly 70 people

Rep. Peter King, R-N.Y., has blocked about 70 people from commenting on his campaign committee’s Facebook page, a civil rights organization said. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

When Rep. Peter King congratulated former ExxonMobil CEO Rex Tillerson on his appointment to secretary of state on Facebook, a constituent responded by posting a link to donations the oil company made to King and other federal lawmakers.

“Money talks, anyone wondering why [t]he Congressman is not expressing any concern or doubt need look no further,” the constituent wrote.

Trump to ‘Sleepy Joe’ Biden: ‘I will see you at the Starting Gate!’
POTUS warns former VP that Democratic primary will be a ‘nasty’ fight

Then-Vice President Joe Biden speaks at the Georgetown Law School in Washington on March 23, 2016. He announced his third White House bid on Thursday. (Photo By Al Drago/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump has challenged former Vice President Joe Biden to a general election race, telling the former vice president hours after his presidential campaign announcement that he “will see you at the Starting Gate!”

The president appears to see Biden as a legitimate threat and has predicted that he and Vermont Independent Sen. Bernie Sanders will end up clashing for the Democratic nomination.

In 2020, Biden experience could turn out to be baggage
Former vice president may have to answer for positions now out of favor in party moving further left

Former Vice President Joe Biden announced he is seeking the Democratic presidential nomination on Thursday. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images file photo)

Joe Biden entered the 2020 race for president Thursday at the top of the polls, with universal name recognition and the still-fresh sheen of his time as a popular vice president to Barack Obama.

In a video posted to his social media platforms, Biden characterized the race as a “battle for the soul of this nation.”

Echoes of Big Tobacco fight in Big Pharma hearings
Drug companies have leveraged high-profile hearings on rising drug prices into an opportunity

From right, Sanofi CEO Olivier Brandicourt, Pfizer CEO Albert Bourla, Merck CEO Kenneth C. Frazier, Johnson & Johnson pharmaceuticals head Jennifer Taubert, Bristol-Myers Squibb CEO Giovanni Caforio, AstraZeneca CEO Pascal Soriot, and AbbVie CEO Richard A. Gonzalez prepare to face a Feb. 26 Senate Finance hearing on rising drug prices. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Congress has made curtailing high drug prices a priority this year and has hauled in some of Big Pharma’s top executives to prove it.

Committee hearings on drug prices — the House and Senate have held a half dozen this year — have sought accountability from the industry for drug prices that have forced patients into agonizing decisions about how to budget their lives and caused one-in-four diabetics to ration insulin.

Think 20 presidential candidates is a lot? Try 300-plus
A simple federal form is all it takes to be an ‘official’ candidate, but getting noticed is harder

The large field of Republican presidential candidates in the 2016 cycle led Fox Business Network, based on poll ratings, to decide that Mike Huckabee, Carly Fiorina and Rick Santorum would participate in their own debate, separately from the top seven candidates in the race. (Andrew Burton/Getty Images file photo)

More than 300 citizens since January have filed paperwork with the Federal Election Commission to run for president of the United States.

The full list features candidates from dozens of states, with multiple political affiliations.

Another pitfall of nerd prom: food allergies
You say tomato, we say EpiPen: Celebrated chef preps for all eventualities ahead of White House Correspondents’ Association dinner

Washington Hilton executive chef Andre Cote prepares for the White House Correspondents’ Association Dinner. (Nathan OuelletteCQ Roll Call)

Gluten-free, dairy-free, vegan — these are just some of the restrictions Washington Hilton executive chef Andre Cote has to plan for ahead of the White House Correspondents’ Association dinner. Ever heard of a nightshade allergy? Chef Andre has, and so have the countless tomatoes, eggplants, peppers and potatoes that have gone un-enjoyed thanks to someone’s sensitivity.

The aversion is unfortunate news for the 6,000 red and yellow pear tomatoes ordered ahead of this year’s dinner, but luckily, the team in place at the Washington Hilton has already taken your allergies and intolerances into consideration long before you have the chance to send back your plate.

Women share pride in Eleanor Holmes Norton dedication at Georgetown Law
Friends and supporters laud D.C. delegate’s role in ‘civil rights and women’s rights and D.C. rights’

Breaking ground on the Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton Green and monument at Georgetown Law Center are, from left, D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser; Georgetown Law Center Dean William Treanor; Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, D-D.C.; Rep. Jamie Raskin, D-Md.; and Georgetown President John DeGioia. (Clyde McGrady/CQ Roll Call)

The Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton Green at Georgetown University Law Center is a point of pride for the women in attendance for its groundbreaking Tuesday.

Surrounded by her children, grandchildren, colleagues and friends among the 150 supporters beneath a white reception tent on the law center’s green, Norton, 81, basked in the honor and recounted the civil rights and feminist battles fought during her time in and out of office.

Why a crowded 2020 ‘knife fight’ is good for Democrats
Political Theater, Episode 67

Former Vice President Joe Biden, right, and Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., left, (seen here at a swearing-in ceremony in the Capitol's Old Senate Chamber, January 03, 2017, with Harris' husband Douglas Emhoff) are vying for the Democratic presidential nomination. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Democrats continue to throw their hats into the 2020 presidential race, and veteran strategist Rodell Mollineau thinks that’s a healthy way to work out the party’s message during a “once in a generation time” for them. “I’m all for this,” he says. Mollineau, a founder of American Bridge and Rokk Solutions, and previously a staffer for Senate majority leaders Tom Daschle and Harry Reid, discusses with Jason Dick and Nathan Gonzales the burgeoning field, what an ideal ticket would look like and learning from 2016’s mistakes.

How a Republican border trip amplified a bogus tuberculosis rumor
Local public health officials quickly debunked rumors of an outbreak

US Army Ranger helps his unit erect a chain-link fence that will be topping with barbed wire parallel to the primary steel US/Mexico border fence to further fortify the border against people crossing illegally into the United States from Mexico on March 16, 2006 near the border town of near San Luis, south of Yuma, Arizona. Rep. Andy Biggs led a delegation of Republican lawmakers including John Joyce. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)

The office of Rep. John Joyce on Tuesday pulled back the congressman's bogus claim that immigrants seeking refuge over the Arizona border brought drug-resistant strains of tuberculosis to the U.S. 

Joyce made the false claim in a briefing with reporters during a congressional trip led by Arizona GOP Rep. Andy Biggs last week to the U.S.-Mexican border near Yuma, Ariz. The claim was then echoed in the national press.