EXBR

Transparency advocates call on Capitol Police to improve public records policies
Group says it has tried to obtain documents that are considered public without success

A letter sent last week to USCP Chief Matthew R. Verderosa calls for the department to publish its guidelines and procedures on public documents. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A group is calling for increased transparency for the Capitol Police, a department of more than 2,000 employees with a budget topping $450 million.

A letter sent last week to USCP Police Chief Matthew R. Verderosa calls for the department to publish its guidelines and procedures on what it considers public documents that the public and news media have access to.

Aide to Rep. Clay Higgins arrested on pandering charges
Jerod C. Prunty worked as a field representative for the Louisiana congressman

Jerold Prunty, a field representative for Rep. Clay Higgins, R-Louisiana, faces two charges of pandering and has been placed on administrative leave. (Lafayette Parish Sheriff’s Office)

An aide to Rep. Clay Higgins was arrested this weekend in connection to a bust at massage parlors and residences in Louisiana that might have involved human trafficking, according to local media reports.

Police in Lafayette Parish arrested Jerod C. Prunty Saturday and charged him with two counts of pandering, The Advocate reported. His arrest is related to those of eight other people in Lafayette Parish last week, officials said.

Bernie Sanders says he’s running for president again
Independent Vermont senator won 23 primaries and caucuses in 2016 before conceding to Hillary Clinton

Sen. Bernie Sanders talks with reporters in the Capitol after the Senate passed the government funding bill on Thursday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., confirmed Tuesday he will seek the Democratic nomination to the presidency in 2020 to Vermont Public Radio.

A formal announcement is expected later today, VPR News reported.

You lost a House race in 2018? Now run for Senate in 2020
Some failed House candidates may try to ‘fail up’ to the Senate

National Democrats are encouraging Kentucky’s Amy McGrath, who narrowly lost a race for the 6th District last fall, to consider challenging Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell in 2020. (Jason Davis/Getty Images file photo)

“What’s next?” is a question J.D. Scholten often hears when he’s at the grocery store.

For most failed House candidates like Scholten, the answer doesn’t include running for Senate. But the Iowan is not your average losing candidate.

These toxins last ‘forever.’ But the EPA is going slow
PFAS were used for decades to make cookware, microwave popcorn bags, carpeting, rainwear and shoes

Andrew Wheeler, acting administrator at the Environmental Protection Agency, prepares to testify before the Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works in August. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

When two officials from the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality showed up at Sandy Wynn-Stelt’s Belmont, Michigan, house in July of 2017 asking to test her private water well, she didn’t anticipate trouble.

So she was stunned when they discovered incredibly high levels of a class of chemicals that are raising serious pollution and health concerns as communities around the country discover their water is contaminated with them.

Supreme Court will decide census citizenship question
Decision could affect congressional delegations and appropriations

The Supreme Court will hear oral arguments in the citizenship question case the second week of April. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Supreme Court will decide by the end of June whether the Trump administration can add a citizenship question to the 2020 census, a quick schedule so questionnaires can be printed on time.

In a one-line order Friday, the justices agreed to hear oral arguments in the case the second week of April. The Justice Department asked for the rapid review because the government must finalize the census questionnaire by the end of June, which is also when the Supreme Court term ends.

Trump’s wall words will be used against him
President may have undercut his own argument that the border emergency is, well, an emergency

Protesters erect a cardboard wall in front of the Trump International Hotel Las Vegas in 2016. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

If there were a hall of fame of legal self-owns, there would be a spot of honor for a line Friday from President Donald Trump as he announced that he would declare a national emergency to fund a wall on the U.S.-Mexico border.

To do so, Trump plans in part to use the National Emergency Act of 1976, but he undercut his argument that it was an emergency at all.

The Americans paying more taxes
Podcast, Episode 140

The IRS currently faces the tough task of implementing the most sweeping tax overhaul in decades. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

 

Tax season has begun, and upper-middle-income taxpayers earning between $120,000 and $200,000 in states with high local taxes are the most likely to be among the 5 percent who paid more last year because of the 2017 law, says Kyle Pomerleau, director of the Center for Quantitative Analysis at the Tax Foundation, a nonpartisan think tank. Doug Sword, CQ’s tax reporter, explains how congressional Democrats, and those running for president, are attacking the law.

Valentine’s, sweets and a national emergency: Congressional Hits and Misses
Week of Feb. 11, 2019

Sen. Tom Udall gave Sen. Amy Klobuchar a cookie as a thank you gift and Sen. Thom Tillis repeated his Valentine’s Day stunt from last year by showing a pink-scribbled card for his wife on the Senate floor.

But it wasn’t all love in D.C. this week as Sen. Chuck Grassley groused about being interrupted for Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s announcement that President Donald Trump would be declaring a national emergency, and Trump geared up for likely legal challenges to his wall-building aspirations.

Trump wings it in feisty, combative Rose Garden emergency announcement
POTUS berates reporters, slams Dems as policy event morphs into campaign rally

\President Donald Trump speaks in the White House Rose Garden on Friday. Trump said he would declare a national emergency to free up federal funding to build a wall along the southern border. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

ANALYSIS  — A testy and combative President Donald Trump winged it Friday in the Rose Garden, turning an often-rambling defense of his border security emergency into a 2020 assault on Democrats.

Trump has redefined the presidency around his unique style and penchant for unpredictable and unprecedented moves, as well as the sharp rhetoric he uses both at the White House and his rowdy campaign rallies. But there was something different during Trump’s remarks Friday, with the president leading off his remarks by talking about anything but the compromise funding measure and border security actions he signed later that day.