IMGR

Schiff under siege: Republicans cite Intelligence Committee’s ‘vendetta’ against Trump
California Democrat shrugs off GOP criticism: ‘I would expect nothing less’

House Intelligence Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., holds a media availability on the Intelligence Committee's Russia investigation in 2017. Republicans have dinged Schiff for statements about collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia now seen as hyperbolic at best. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Republicans have made House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff their new bogeyman as they run a victory lap over Attorney General William Barr’s report on the special counsel investigation into possible collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia.

Republicans have called for Schiff to resign as chairman for repeatedly declaring he had seen evidence of collusion between Russia and President Donald Trump, including a claim that “there is more than circumstantial evidence.”

Mueller report has gone from ‘witch hunt’ to ‘gold standard’ at White House
Kellyanne Conway warns House Democrats over plans to continue their own investigations

Special Counsel Robert S. Mueller III walks with his wife Ann Mueller on Sunday in Washington. White House counselor Kellyanne Conway on Tuesday called his investigation "the gold standard." (Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images)

At the White House, Special Counsel Robert S. Mueller’s Russia election meddling investigation has quickly morphed from a “hoax” and a “witch hunt” into the “gold standard.”

President Donald Trump and his team hammered the probe for two years as illegitimate and based on a Democratic hope that his 2016 campaign conspired with the Russian government to hand him the general election win over Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton. Just on Sunday, minutes after Attorney General William Barr’s summary of Mueller’s report was released, Trump called the probe an “illegal takedown that failed.”

A 25-cent gas tax hike has support, but is 5 cents a year enough?
Right now, the hike is needed to maintain current spending levels, and isn’t enough to pare down a growing project backlog

A pothole is visible on a road on April 25, 2017, in San Rafael, California. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

As Congress debates how to prevent the Highway Trust Fund from becoming insolvent, groups as disparate as the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the AFL-CIO are urging lawmakers to bite the bullet and raise the gas tax by 25 cents a gallon over five years.

But even if they bite it, a nickel increase every year for five years may not be a magic bullet. That’s because the extra money in the early years will be needed just to maintain the current level of spending, and provide nothing to attack a growing backlog of projects.

A pot banking bill is headed to House markup with bipartisan support
If passed, state-sanctioned marijuana growers and dispensaries would have better access to the financial system

Reps. Hakeem Jeffries, D-N.Y., right, and Ed Perlmutter, D-Colo., make their way to the Capitol before the last votes of the week in the House on Dec. 13, 2018. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

As the House Financial Services Committee takes up a pot banking bill with broad bipartisan support, the legal barriers preventing state-sanctioned marijuana growers and dispensaries from accessing the financial system may soon go up in smoke.

The pot banking bill is one of five scheduled for committee markup Tuesday, and with 143 co-sponsors — including 12 Republicans — it’s the one with the most support. First proposed by Colorado Democratic Rep. Ed Perlmutter in 2013, this version was introduced by Perlmutter and Washington Democrat Denny Heck, as well as Ohio Republicans Warren Davidson and Steve Stivers.

Trump, House Republicans meet to line up support for new NAFTA
The USMCA would replace NAFTA, if simple majorities in the House and Senate approve it.

President Donald Trump, flanked from left by Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wyo., Sen. John Thune, R-S. Dak., Vice President Mike Pence, Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., stops to speak to the cameras following his lunch with Senate Republicans in the Capitol on Wed. Jan. 9, 2019. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump is scheduled to meet with a number of House Republicans later Tuesday as the White House steps up efforts to increase support for the proposed trade agreement to replace NAFTA.

The afternoon meeting comes after Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer courted House Democrats earlier this month with closed-door meetings on the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement. It would replace the North American Free Trade Agreement if simple majorities in the House and Senate approve it.

Chicago mayor candidate has ‘alliance with the devil,’ Rep. Bobby Rush says
Chicago Democrat and longtime civil rights activist accused fellow Democrat Lori Lightfoot of protecting rogue police officers

Rep. Bobby Rush, D-Ill., flanked by then-House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi and Dan Gross, president of the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence, speaks about his family's experience with gun violence in 2016. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Bobby Rush has vociferously denounced one of the two candidates in a runoff election for Chicago mayor as the pro-police option who has not done enough to curb police brutality in the city.

Rush, a civil rights leader and longtime Chicago Democrat in the U.S. House, reignited the conversation surrounding police brutality over the weekend when he accused Democrat Lori Lightfoot, one of the two candidates to emerge for the run-off, of protecting rogue police officers who use excessive force.

Rep. Tulsi Gabbard: Mueller discovering collusion could have ‘led to civil war’
Hawaii congresswoman has centered her 2020 campaign on her anti-war views

The presidential campaign of Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, D-Hawaii, has not gained traction in early polls since her February kickoff event. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Presidential candidate Tulsi Gabbard appeared relieved that Robert S. Mueller III’s investigation did not establish a case that the Donald Trump campaign colluded with Russia in the 2016 election and urged her Democratic colleagues to move on.

The Hawaii congresswoman, who has centered her fledgling 2020 campaign on her anti-war views, raised the possibility that the discovery of collusion could have set in motion a “terribly divisive crisis,” and even a civil war.

Kamala Harris details plan to boost teacher pay by an average of $13,500
California Democrat’s proposal would provide an abundance of federal funding

Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., has a new campaign proposal that would boost teacher pay. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Democratic presidential candidate Kamala Harris on Tuesday announced details of her plan to boost salaries for teachers across the country.

The junior senator from California talked about the plan over the weekend at a campaign event in Houston, saying it would represent “the largest federal investment in teachers’ salaries in the history of the United States.”

Mueller report isn’t changing 2020 campaign dynamics — yet
Conclusions have emboldened some Republicans, but Democrats still aren’t talking about Russia

While some Republicans like South Carolina Sen. Lindsey Graham used the Mueller report to double down on defending Trump, Democrats signaled they’d continue their 2018 focus on economic issues  — and not the Russia investigation — heading into 2020. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

As news of the just-completed Russia investigation engulfs Washington, not much has changed on the campaign trail — for either party.

The full report by special counsel Robert S. Mueller III has yet to see the light of day. And with the 2020 elections more than a year and a half away, plenty could change between now and then. But so far, the calculation on both sides isn’t too different from the past two years.