Business

Meet Pat Tiberi, the Latest Soon-to-Be-Ex-Congressman
Ohio policy wonk liked his bocce

Pat Tiberi succeeded his former boss in the House, John Kasich. (Ian Wagreich/Roll Call)

Rep. Pat Tiberi, the Ohio Republican who announced it was quitting time on Thursday, is a serious policy wonk with deep political roots in the Buckeye State and a big fan of bocce, befitting his celebration of his Italian heritage.

An unapologetic Midwestern Rotary Club-type Republican in the mode of his political patrons, former Speaker John A. Boehner and Gov. John R. Kasich, Tiberi will leave Congress by Jan. 31 — before his ninth term in the House ends — and become head of the Ohio Business Roundtable.

Pat Tiberi Resigning to Lead Ohio Business Roundtable
Nine-term lawmaker will leave behind solid Republican seat

Ohio Rep. Pat Tiberi has been offered a position to lead the Ohio Business Roundtable. (Bill Clark/Roll Call File Photo)

Ohio Rep. Pat Tiberi announced Thursday he will not seek re-election and will be leaving Congress before the 2018 midterms. 

“While I have not yet determined a final resignation date, I will be leaving Congress by January 31, 2018,” the Republican said in a statement. 

Word on the Hill: Negativity Causes Bipartisanship?
Women golfers event, Cyberweek, wildfire victims

Hillary Clinton arrives at Donald Trump’s inauguration in January. A new survey shows that 59 percent of people who voted for Clinton believe elected officials have low ethical standards. (Tom Williams/Roll Call)

Here’s one thing Democrats and Republicans have in common: Both are having trust issues. Americans’ discontent with the political and business world is not party-specific, a Morning Consult/Public Affairs Council survey revealed.

Fifty-eight percent of people who voted for Donald Trump and 59 percent of Hillary Clinton voters said elected officials have low honesty and ethical standards. Meanwhile, less than half of those surveyed said they trusted major companies to behave ethically. 

Greg Pence Files Papers to Run for Congress in Indiana
VP’s brother is finance chairman for Rep. Luke Messer’s Senate bid

Greg Pence, here with his wife Denise at this year’s presidential inauguration, filed paperwork Wednesday to run for Congress. (Courtesy Denise Pence/Facebook)

Greg Pence, the oldest brother of Vice President Mike Pence, has filed tax paperwork indicating he plans to run for Congress, The Associated Press reported.

He formed the Greg Pence for Congress Committee on Monday, according to an IRS filing obtained by The AP.

Johnson to Press OPM on Congressional Health Care Benefits
Homeland Security chairman wants documents on how Obama-era ruling came to be

Wisconsin Sen. Ron Johnson is chairman of the committee that oversees the federal workforce. (Bill Clark/Roll Call)

Lawmakers and congressional staff might want to pay attention Wednesday morning when President Donald Trump’s nominees for the top two spots at the government’s personnel office face a Senate committee.

Most of the day’s attention will be on the Senate Judiciary hearing featuring Attorney General Jeff Sessions. But Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Chairman Ron Johnson is focused on the Office of Personnel Management, and the agency’s treatment of health insurance benefits for lawmakers and congressional aides.

Peyton Manning, Former NFL Players Back Gonzalez in Ohio
Ex-Indianapolis Colts wideout Anthony Gonzalez works NFL connections for big donations

Former Ohio State University football standout and NFL wide receiver Anthony Gonzalez has earned the support of NFL friends and some experienced GOP operatives. (Courtesy Anthony Gonzalez for Congress/Facebook)

Former NFL wide receiver Anthony Gonzalez stopped collecting passes from Peyton Manning when Manning left for the Denver Broncos in 2011.

Now Gonzalez is collecting campaign money from his former quarterback.

Mining Concerns Animate Minnesota Swing District
Rick Nolan gets challenger for DFL endorsement

Minnesota Rep. Rick Nolan, center, talks with Mark Froemke, right, and Wayne Fleischhacker, of the AFL-CIO, during a fish fry and fundraiser last fall. (Tom Williams/Roll Call File Photo)

First-time candidate Leah Phifer doesn’t have many policy differences with Democratic-Farmer-Labor Rep. Rick Nolan — an original co-sponsor of the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness Act — except on one issue.

Phifer thinks her fellow Democrat has gone too far toward siding with the mining industry. The former FBI counterterrorism analyst is seeking the DFL’s endorsement for Minnesota’s 8th District and kicked off her campaign over the weekend.

Judgment Days for Judicial Nominees
Several factors will affect schedule for Senate confirmation of judges

The Republican president and Senate have a chance to reshape the judicial branch, but several factors will determine how things stack up . (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Senators face a lengthy list of President Donald Trump’s judicial picks, but consideration of the nominees could be affected by three significant factors: an extensive backlog of vacancies, Republican leaders’ willingness to continue altering chamber traditions, and the Democrats’ lack of motivation to aid GOP efforts to remake the judiciary.

There are 121 vacancies at the U.S. District Court level and an additional 21 vacancies on federal appeals courts, according to the Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts.

With One Now in the White House, Celebrities Crowd the Political Stage
It doesn’t end with Kid Rock; actors, a former Olympian and one of the ”sexiest men alive” plan to run

Kid Rock may have been among the first celebrities to emerge as a potential candidate in 2018, but he wasn’t the last. (Theo Wargo/Getty Images)

That led to chatter that Peyton Manning, the legendary NFL and University of Tennessee quarterback, could take the Republican senator’s Tennessee seat. But with Manning quickly quashing speculation he would make the race, Kid Rock was back on top.

“We will be scheduling a press conference in the next 6 weeks or so to address this issue amongst others, and if I decide to throw my hat in the ring for US Senate, believe me …  it’s game on mthrfkers,” his campaign website states.

Opinion: Harvey Weinstein and the GOP’s Guilt-By-Association Game
A sense of proportion — and less hypocrisy — would be nice

President Donald Trump is among the many politicians who have crossed paths with Harvey Weinstein. Melania Trump, the future president, Georgina Chapman (Weinstein’s now-estranged wife) and Weinstein were photographed together at an after party for the New York premiere of the movie “NINE.” President Trump recently told reporters that he’s known Weinstein a long time and was not surprised by allegations of sexual misconduct against him. (Stephen Lovekin/Getty Images for the Weinstein Company)

The odds are high that this autumn members of Congress — maybe both Democrats and Republicans — will pocket campaign contributions from Americans who will later be engulfed in scandal. The besmirched political donors could be exposed as Ponzi scheme promoters, corrupt corporate executives, crooked lawyers or sex offenders.

Amid the predictable uproar when the news stories break, there will be loud partisan cries to return all campaign contributions from these disgraced figures. And so congressional incumbents will scramble to explain a half-forgotten $2,700 check from a fundraiser and a hastily scrawled “To My Dear Friend ...” inscription on a photograph from the event.