Capitol Hill

Former NFL player Steve Gleason joins ranks of Mother Teresa and Pope John Paul II
Former Saints player to be awarded Congressional Gold Medal for ALS work

Former New Orleans Saints player Steve Gleason and his wife, Michel Varisco Gleason, roll in the Krewe of Orpheus parade in New Orleans in March 2019. (Erika Goldring/Getty Images file photo)

A week from Wednesday, congressional leaders will gather on Capitol Hill to award the next recipient of the highest honor that Congress can grant a civilian.

Fewer than 200 people have received the Congressional Gold Medal, and former New Orleans Saints player Steve Gleason will be the first NFL player to make the cut on a list that includes the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., Rosa Parks, Pope John Paul II and Mother Teresa.

Flashback Friday: Retiring Rep. Phil Roe sang for Heard on the Hill in 2011
Roe and staff performed “Amazing Grace” and “Will the Circle Be Unbroken”

Tennessee Rep. Phil Roe prepares to play a bluegrass song with Alex Large, a staff assistant in his office. Roe announced Friday he will retire from Congress at the end of 2020. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Greg Pence calls House impeachment vote ‘Bulls--- to the fourth degree’
TMZ caught a couple of members on the Hill Thursday

Indiana Rep. Greg Pence calls House impeachment vote “bulls--- to the fourth degree” (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

“Bullsh-- to the fourth degree”: That’s what Rep. Greg Pence had to say Thursday morning as TMZ not-so-pleasantly surprised the congressman and asked him his thoughts on the House vote to impeach President Donald Trump just the night before.

The vice president’s brother was entering what appeared to be the Cannon Office Building along with Rep. Michael Waltz, who seems to have slipped away from the scene unscathed.

Impeachment: It’s for the kids!
Members address kids, grandkids, grandkids’ grandkids, and grandkids’ grandkids’ grandkids

Rep. Joseph P. Kennedy III, D-Mass., buttons his jacket after he was interviewed on camera in the Cannon rotunda as the House of Representatives takes up articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump in the Capitol on Dec. 18. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

Absolutely no day is too busy to remind your kids to “listen to mom” and dad, apparently — even if you are a member of Congress voting to impeach the president of the United States. Massachusetts Democratic Rep. Joseph P. Kennedy III did just that Wednesday in his floor speech.

“Dear Ellie and James,” the dad began his speech, as if penning a letter. (Not that they would know what a “letter” is).

Move, Mitch, get out the way!
The Senate majority leader doesn't have time to be on time

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s ’burbs are creating a roadblock on Capitol Hill. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Capitol Hill resident Maria Helena Carey was none too pleased Tuesday morning to find (what she believes are) Mitch McConnell’s two black ’Burbs illegally parked on her street AGAIN.

“Every single day these guys. Idling for 15-30 minutes at a time, waiting to pick up Mitch McConnell,” Carey tweeted before 9 a.m.

Think big, be humble and remember to serve coffee
Rep. Case recalls lessons from original Aloha State representatives

Hawaii Rep. Ed Case spent time as a House intern and staffer in the House and Senate before coming to Congress. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Hawaii Rep. Ed Case relays a Grateful Dead lyric to describe his journey to Congress: “What a long strange trip it’s been.”

Case says his experiences as an intern and staffer in the House and Senate with his former boss, Spark M. Matsunaga, brought him from pondering his post-college plans to charting a course to Capitol Hill. Back in Congress after 12 years, he now holds the same Honolulu-area seat as Matsunaga did before he was elected to the Senate. (Case previously represented the 2nd District, which encompasses most of Oahu that is not Honolulu and the other islands.)

Pelosi lights the 2019 Capitol Christmas Tree
The 2019 tree is a blue spruce from New Mexico

Speaker Nancy Pelosi stands with band members during a ceremony to light the U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree, which is displayed on the West Front of the Capitol. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

Watch: Capitol Christmas Tree arrives on the West Lawn
This year’s tree came from the Carson National Forest in New Mexico

Architect of the Capitol workers erect the Capitol Christmas Tree on the West Lawn Monday. The tree is from the Carson National Forest in New Mexico. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

The 2019 Capitol Christmas Tree arrived on the West Lawn Monday, completing its nearly 2,000 mile journey from New Mexico’s Carson National Forest.

Weepy-eyed Boehner roasted at portrait unveiling
Grab the tissues

Former Speaker of the House John Boehner wipes away tears as House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy speaks during Boehner’s portrait unveiling on Tuesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

How you (and your pet!) can be buried at the Congressional Cemetery
Dog-walking, movie nights and pet burials at the historic boneyard

A woman wanders the grounds of the Congressional Cemetery along with two canine companions. (Thomas McKinless/CQ Roll Call)

Despite its namesake, the Congressional Cemetery has about 5,000 plots available, and no, you don’t have to be a member of Congress to be buried in one. “The only requirement for being buried here is you have to be dead,” says Paul Williams, president of Historic Congressional Cemetery.

But the cemetery, situated in Southeast D.C., is not just a burial ground. It also serves as “a Central Park for this part of Capitol Hill,” according to Williams. It hosts parties, yoga, movie nights and has a dog-walking program. And you don’t have to be dead to partake in those.