celebrities

Opinion: With a Potemkin President, Maybe It’s Time for Congressional Government
With Trump, the less he does the better

A strong case can be made that the less President Donald Trump does, the better off Americans are, Shapiro writes. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images file photo)

In 1885, an up-and-coming Ph.D. student named Woodrow Wilson wrote the book that would establish his academic reputation. Entitled “Congressional Government,” Wilson’s conclusions reflected “the declining prestige of the presidential office” in the decades following the death of Abraham Lincoln.

“That high office has fallen from its first estate of dignity because its power has waned,” Wilson wrote in his introduction. “And its power has waned because the power of Congress has become predominant.”

Opinion: Why Oprah in 2020 Is Both Blessing and Curse for Trump and the GOP
Talk of her running for president a political threat, but could distract from “Fire and Fury”

Oprah Winfrey arrives with the Cecil B. DeMille Award in the press room during the 75th Annual Golden Globe Awards at the Beverly Hilton Hotel on Sunday. (Kevin Winter/Getty Images)

It didn’t take long for “Oprah in 2020” to start trending after the one-named icon’s stirring Golden Globes speech on Sunday night.

Perhaps unsurprisingly, considering his gift for exploiting political and cultural fault lines, one of the first to connect the media and philanthropic queen to electoral gold was none other than Donald Trump, who has said in the past that the two on a presidential ticket would win “easily.”

Trump v. Bannon: Trial of the Century or Just Trash Talk?
Legal experts doubt president would brave legal scrutiny to follow through on lawsuit threat

Steve Bannon arrives for Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore’s “Drain the Swamp” campaign rally in Midland City, Ala., in December. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

It would be the political trial of the century: President Donald Trump versus former White House chief strategist Steve Bannon.

But don’t expect the president’s legal threats against his former right-hand man to escalate beyond the cease-and-desist letter from his lawyers, legal experts say.

Former Congresswomen Share Stories of Harassment
Former Rep. Mary Bono said rumors of an affair with former Speaker Newt Gingrich ended up in the National Enquirer

Rep. Mary Bono, R-Calif., says sexual harassment on Capitol Hill is at a “watershed moment.” (Thomas McKinless/CQ Roll Call)

Former congresswoman Mary Bono knows sexual harassment is rampant on Capitol Hill because she experienced it firsthand.

“My first year, first or second year in the Congress, I was accused of having an affair with Newt Gingrich. It was on the front page of the National Enquirer,” she recalled.

Alabama Senate Race Heads to Dramatic Finish
Still unclear which candidate will win

Alabama Republican Roy Moore rides away on his horse after voting at the Gallant Volunteer Fire Department in Gallant, Ala., on Tuesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

GALLANT, Ala. — Capping the wild ride of the Alabama Senate race, Roy Moore made his traditional trek to the polls on horseback.

The Republican candidate was greeted by a horde of reporters and cameras as he rode to the fire station here on his white and brown horse with his wife Kayla, who was also riding her horse.

Why Is Eliot Engel a Rock Star in Kosovo?
New York Democrat has his name on street signs and his image on a stamp

New York Rep. Eliot L. Engel was recently honored by the Kosovo government with his image on a stamp. (Courtesy Engel's office)

When Rep. Eliot L. Engel walks down the street in the tiny Balkan republic of Kosovo, he often gets the celebrity treatment.  

“I became very well-known in the country because people saw me on TV, were told what I was doing in Washington,” the New York Democrat said. “Today … it’s not uncommon for people to stop me in the streets and ask to take pictures with me.”

Honoring Eisenhower at Long Last
Memorial to 34th president broke ground Nov. 2

An artist’s rendering of the Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial on the National Mall in Washington, scheduled to be completed by 2020. (Courtesy Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial Commission)

Its critics have called it a “monstrosity,” an “exercise in postmodern grandiosity,” and a “textbook example of the Washington swamp Donald Trump vowed to drain.”

Now, though, a memorial to former President Dwight D. Eisenhower, mired in controversy for more than 17 years, is the newest monument under construction on the National Mall.

Word on the Hill: Hobbit in Congress?
AUMF play, McCain’s had it with his boot, and Scott hosts Carson in South Carolina

Sean Astin, who played Samwise Gamgee in J. R. R. Tolkien’s “The Lord of the Rings” trilogy, is looking to throw his hat into the ... Ring. (New Line Cinema)

Is there another celebrity waiting in the wings to join those who have thrown their names in the ring to run for public office?

As if Congress wasn’t nerdy enough, J. R. R. Tolkien’s famous hobbit of the Shire, Samwise Gamgee, tweeted at a fan that being a member of Congress would be a “dream come true.”

Word on the Hill: Republicans Tour Jordan Airport
Pingree awarded, Veterans History Project discussion, and ‘The Long Road’

New York Rep. John Katko meets refugees at Zaatri refugee camp in northern Jordan. (Courtesy House Homeland Security Committee)

A delegation led by Rep. John Katko, R-N.Y., over last week’s recess included a stop in Jordan. The group toured Queen Alia International Airport, the largest airport in the country, to observe aviation security procedures and employee screening.

The U.S. donated passenger screening equipment to Jordan and other countries in 2016 under the FAA Extension, Safety and Security Act.

Word on the Hill: No More Recess
Your social calendar for the week

Both chambers are in this week. Sen. Pat Roberts, R-Kan., rides the Senate subway to the Capitol for a vote on Thursday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Both chambers are in session with the House back this week.

Aside from policy news, keep up to date with the controversy over Cups. The beloved food and coffee joint in the Russell Senate Office Building is competing with other companies to keep its contract.