Charlie Dent

Republicans Need a Cold Compress With Less Than One Month to Go
Presidential pain still plagues vulnerable incumbents ahead of the midterms

President Donald Trump may turn out Democrats better than any Democrat could. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call file photo)

ANALYSIS — Weather metaphors are often used (and overused) in election analysis, but there’s a better way to describe the Republicans’ challenge in 2018. The GOP is dealing with many headaches as it tries to preserve the Republican congressional majorities.

From tension to cluster to migraine, they can vary in frequency and severity. And Republicans’ ability to alleviate them will determine control of the House and Senate in the 116th Congress.

House GOP Moving Right, Democratic Direction Less Clear
With pragmatists in fewer supply among Republicans, conference will be in less of a mood to compromise

The retirement of pragmatic Republicans like Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, R-Fla., threatens to move the House Republican Conference further to the right. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

ANALYSIS — We don’t know exactly how many House seats Democrats will gain in November, though Democratic control of the chamber next year looks almost inevitable. But even now it is clear that the midterm results will move Republicans further to the right. Where the Democrats will stand is less clear.

In the House, GOP losses will be disproportionately large in the suburbs and among members of the Republican Main Street Partnership, the House GOP group that puts “country over party” and values “compromise over conflict,” according to its website.

5 States That Will Decide the House Majority
Watch these states to tell if Democrats are having a good election night

California Democrat Harley Rouda, here with a supporter at a rally in Laguna Beach in May, is challenging GOP Rep. Dana Rohrabacher in the 48th District. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

With a growing number of vulnerable House districts, there might be too much to watch for on election night. But by focusing on just a handful of states, you can get a pretty good idea of whether Democrats are having a good enough night to gain the 23 seats necessary to win back the majority.

Competitive races: 5

Something Old, Something New, Someone Appointed, Neither Blue
Republicans Jon Kyl and Troy Balderson sworn in on Wednesday

Speaker Paul D. Ryan, R-Wis., left, conducts a ceremonial swearing-in for Rep. Troy Balderson, R-Ohio, second from right, before being sworn in on the House floor Wednesday Sept. 5, 2018. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call)

Congress grew by two Republicans on Wednesday when Jon Kyl was sworn on the Senate side and Troy Balderson over in the House. 

Shortly after the Senate convened at noon and voted to confirm Elad Roisman to be a member of the Securities and Exchange Commission, Vice President Mike Pence swore in Kyl, a former Senate minority whip who retired in 2013 but was appointed on Tuesday to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz.

Sexual Misconduct Investigation of Pennsylvania Congressional Hopeful Closed With No Finding
Marty Nothstein said he was the victim of a smear that has damaged his campaign

Republican candidate for Pennsylvania’s new 7th District Marty Nothstein was accused of sexual misconduct around 2000, but the investigation found no wrongdoing. (MartyforPA.com/Screenshot)

A sexual misconduct investigation of Pennsylvania Republican congressional hopeful Marty Nothstein has been closed with, “no evidence of wrongdoing,” but not before inflicting potentially devastating damage, his campaign announced Friday. 

“This was a politically timed smear orchestrated by people who placed winning above fair play and destruction of decency,” Nothstein said at a press conference, according to a transcript provided to Roll call.

Murmurs of Discontent in GOP Ranks As Mueller Nabs Manafort, Cohen
Some House Republicans speak more candidly about what it would take to impeach Trump

Some Republican House members are speaking more candidly about what it would take for them to impeach President Donald Trump. (Win McNamee/Getty Images)

The Republican embrace of President Donald Trump is beginning to show cracks as some rank-and-file GOP lawmakers stepped up their criticism of the president back home in their districts in a week where his former personal lawyer and onetime campaign chairman pleaded to and were found guilty of eight federal crimes apiece.

No one is jumping to conclusions yet about whether Trump should face impeachment. But some Republican lawmakers have been candid in recent days about the prospect of impeaching the president, and what would need to happen for them to consider such a step.

Report: GOP Candidate for Dent’s Seat Faces Sexual Misconduct Allegation
Pennsylvania House hopeful Marty Nothstein says he is victim of anonymous smear campaign

The specific sexual misconduct allegation against Pennsylvania Republican House candidate Marty Nothstein is unclear, but stems from around 2000, when he won an Olympic gold medal in cycling. (MartyforPA.com/Screenshot)

Pennsylvania Republican congressional hopeful Marty Nothstein is facing an allegation of sexual misconduct stemming from nearly 20 years ago.

Nothstein, an Olympic gold medal-winning cyclist running in Pennsylvania’s new 7th District, has denied the allegation. 

House GOP Appropriators Facing Steep Turnover in 116th Congress
Both parties have endured upheaval in wave elections in the past

Two senior House GOP appropriators,  John Culberson, R-Texas, left, and Rodney Frelinghuysen, R-N.J., personify the challenged facing the Appropriations panel heading into the 2018 midterms. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A Democratic “wave” this November, should one materialize, could result in the departure of as many as five senior House Republican appropriators, which would mark the biggest wipeout of major players from one side of the dais in 26 years.

Three subcommittee “cardinals” are facing tough re-election fights this November: Commerce-Justice-Science Chairman John Culberson and Military Construction-VA Chairman John Carter, both of Texas, and Homeland Security Chairman Kevin Yoder of Kansas.

Former Rep. Charlie Dent Takes Job As CNN Commentator
Pennsylvania Republican resigned May 12, got early start to post-Congress life

Former Rep. Charlie Dent, R-Pa., is joining CNN as a political commentator. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Newly minted ex-Congressman Charlie Dent has joined CNN as a political commentator based in his home state of Pennsylvania, a CNN spokesman and a second source familiar with the arrangement confirmed.

Dent, who did not return a request for comment, resigned his House seat on May 12 to get an early start to his life post-Congress. The Pennsylvania Republican had previously announced last year that he would not seek re-election to another term.

No Representative in Congress? Don’t Worry, the House Clerk Has Your Back
Undercover Capitol takes you inside the historic workplace — one video at a time