DACA

DACA recipients attending SOTU don’t want their legal status traded for the wall
‘I refuse to trade my community for a status,’ El Paso DACA recipient Senaida Navar says

Rep. Veronica Escobar, D-Texas, far left, brought Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program recipient Senaida Navar as her guest to State of the Union address on Tuesday. Navar said she does not want her legal status traded for a border wall. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Several Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program recipients attending the State of the Union Tuesday as guests of House Democrats said they do not want their legal status traded for a border wall. 

President Donald Trump tried to end the DACA program, which provides young undocumented immigrants brought to the U.S. as children temporary legal status, but federal courts have so far blocked him from doing so. During various times over the past two years, Trump has floated trading statutory protections for DACA recipients — sometimes permanent, other times time temporary — for funding for a southern border wall.

Capitol Ink | Pelosi The Riveter

Ocasio-Cortez joins most Republicans in voting against House Democratic bills to reopen government
House bills headed nowhere in Senate as upper chamber prepares to hold test votes Thursday that are expected to fail

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., center, voted against two Democratic bills to reopen the government Wednesday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Democrats passed two more bills Wednesday to reopen the government that most Republicans continued to oppose, but there was one surprise in the otherwise predictable floor proceedings — freshman Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez voted “no.”

The New York Democrat, a rising star in the progressive wing of the party with a massive social media following, explained her vote on Instagram. 

Shutdown could cost federal workers second paycheck
CQ Budget Podcast, Episode 95

Members of the Association of Flight Attendants participate in the National Air Traffic Controllers Association rally to “Stop the Shutdown” in front of the Capitol on Thursday, Jan. 10, 2019. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The House and Senate are poised to consider legislation that could end the partial government shutdown — if the competing bills had any chance of passing both chambers, explains CQ budget and appropriations reporter Kellie Mejdrich. Listen for the latest details on how lawmakers are greeting President Donald Trump's immigration-related  offer.

Latino Voters Angry at Trump But Not Mobilized, Democratic Report Finds
Blue candidates need clear message to court Latino votes in midterms, according to study

Latino voters’ anger at Trump administration policies could be an opening for Democrats in 2018 a new report finds. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Democrats have a chance to win big in this year’s midterms by channeling Latino voters’ anger at President Donald Trump’s immigration and health care agenda, according to the findings of a Democratic-funded study released Tuesday.

But first, they’ll have to convince Latinos their vote will mean something.

House Republicans Hope to Resuscitate Immigration Issue
July votes expected on family separation, and guest worker and E-Verify

House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy said GOP leaders will keep their promise for a July vote on an agriculture guest worker program and mandatory E-Verify and are also discussing legislation to address family separations at the border. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Republicans’ thorniest issue, immigration, is not going away after Wednesday’s embarrassing defeat of their “compromise” bill.

GOP leaders are planning votes in July on two more narrow bills that are also not guaranteed to pass. Some rank-and-file Republicans want to continue talks on a larger measure in hopes of finding an elusive path to passage. 

House Rejects GOP’s ‘Compromise’ Immigration Bill — Overwhelmingly
Republicans to turn attention to narrow bill addressing family separations

Speaker Paul D. Ryan has reiterated his support for a Republican compromise immigration bill. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

House Republicans’ legislative attempt to find consensus within their own party on the divisive issue of immigration failed on the floor Wednesday, with the chamber overwhelmingly rejecting their so-called compromise bill, 121-301. 

The outcome was predicted Tuesday as a late amendment that was negotiated over the weekend did not convince enough hesitant members to support the bill. The amendment was left out of the final bill.

House Heads Toward Wednesday Immigration Vote Without Agreement on Changes
Republicans starting to talk about a more narrow bill on family separation

House Majority Whip Steve Scalise, R-La., says he expects the House to vote on an immigration bill this week regardless of whether Republicans can agree to further changes and pass it. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Ongoing negotiations over a House GOP immigration bill have yet to produce an agreement on changes that will secure enough votes to pass the legislation, but Republican leaders are preparing for a vote this week regardless.

“Wednesday we could see Goodlatte 2 on the floor,” House Majority Whip Steve Scalise said.

House GOP ‘Uphill Fight’ on Immigration About More Than Trump
President’s tweets not helping, but Republicans still have major policy divisions

Rep. Jeff Denham, R-Calif., leaves the Capitol in the rain after the final vote of the week on Friday. He plans to spend his weekend continuing negotiations over immigration legislation, striving to reach an agreement on changes before a rescheduled vote next week. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump is certainly not helping House Republicans by deeming their immigration negotiations a waste of time, but he’s far from the only issue they face in what one GOP leader called an “uphill fight” to pass legislation.

The House Republican Conference is still struggling internally to coalesce around a bill that members from the various GOP factions negotiated in recent weeks, dubbed the compromise bill. Republican leaders had initially scheduled a vote on the measure for Thursday, and then thought about Friday. Ultimately, they decided to push it off into the next week to negotiate further changes

Podcast: An Immigration Hardliner's Reasoning
CQ on Congress, Episode 108

A group of mothers and their children protesting the separation of families at the southern border are escorted out of a House Oversight hearing Tuesday June 19, 2018. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call)

Dan Stein, president of the Federation for American Immigration Reform, says tough border policies are crucial to helping low-skilled workers in America. And CQ immigration reporter Dean DeChiaro breaks down the immigration enforcement bill that failed in the House on June 21, and Speaker Paul Ryan's compromise measure, still pending in the House, which would give so-called Dreamers a path to citizenship.