Dave Reichert

Rating Change: Ryan’s Exit Moves Wisconsin Race From Solid to Leans Republican
1st District contest could get competitive under the right circumstances

Speaker Paul D. Ryan, R-Wis., arrives for a press conference Wednesday along with press secretary AshLee Strong to announce his retirement. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Speaker Paul Ryan’s decision not to seek re-election shakes up the Republican leadership ladder in Washington and affects his party’s ability to hold his seat back home in Wisconsin.

While Ryan’s retirement is huge news because of his position, it’s not as electorally alarming to the GOP compared to the retirements of Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen in Florida’s 27th District or Rep. Dave Reichert in Washington’s 8th District. Both leave behind Democratic-leaning seats that Hillary Clinton carried in 2016.

107 House Republicans Urge Trump To Narrow Tariff Proposal
Letter suggests steps that can be taken to 'minimize negative consequences'

Ways and Means Kevin Brady, R-Texas, led a letter of House Republicans urging the president to take steps to minimize negative consequences if he moves forward with his plan to impose tariffs on steel and aluminum imports. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Nearly half of the House Republican Conference sent a letter to President Donald Trump Wednesday expressing “deep concern” about his plan to impose tariffs on steel and aluminum imports and outlined steps he should take to minimize negative consequences.

Led by Ways and Means Chairman Kevin Brady and Trade Subcommittee Chairman Dave Reichert, the letter reflects warnings that congressional Republicans have been communicating to Trump since he announced plans last week to impose a broadly applied 25 percent tariff on steel imports and a 10 percent tariff on aluminum imports.

House Republicans Want Trump to Curtail Tariff Plans, Avoid Legislation
Many in GOP want to avoid a ‘direct affront’ to the president, Sanford says

Speaker Paul D. Ryan and Ways and Means Chairman Kevin Brady have urged President Donald Trump not to move forward with sweeping tariffs on steel and aluminum imports. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Republicans want President Donald Trump to scale back his plan to institute sweeping tariffs on steel and aluminum imports — apparently so they can avoid taking legislative action against him.

Speaker Paul D. Ryanis urging the president not to move on the plan he announced Thursday to impose a 25 percent tariff on steel imports and a 10 percent tariff on aluminum imports. 

Trump-GOP Marriage Sours Again Amid Tariff Tussle
Republican congressional leaders not ruling out counter action

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, Speaker Paul D. Ryan, second lady Karen Pence, Vice President Mike Pence and President Donald Trump at last Wednesday’s ceremony for the late Billy Graham at the Capitol. (Reuters/Aaron P. Bernstein)

In this corner are two wealthy businessmen, Donald Trump and Wilbur Ross. In the opposing corner are Speaker Paul D. Ryan, Senate Finance Committee Chairman Orrin G. Hatch and just about the entire Republican conference.

Not long ago, Trump boasted of leading the most unified Republican Party in American history. A few weeks later, his talk of tariffs on imported steel and aluminum and declaration that “trade wars are good” have caused this marriage of convenience to sour.

Maybe They’re Too Rich for Congress?
Seventeen members departing the Capitol are millionaires

California Rep. Darrell Issa is not running for a 10th term this year. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The wealthy are heading for the exits.

So far, 44 current lawmakers, or one in 12, have announced they are retiring at the end of the year or seeking new offices away from the Capitol. And collectively, they now account for nearly a third of the $2.43 billion in cumulative riches of the 115th Congress.

Ratings Changes: 15 Races Shift Toward Democrats, 1 Toward Republicans
Democratic chances have improved beyond Pennsylvania

From left, Democrats Josh Gottheimer of New Jersey and Stephanie Murphy of Florida are looking more secure in their re-elections this fall, while, from right, Republicans Ted Budd and Mimi Walters may be more vulnerable. (Bill Clark/Thomas McKinless/CQ Roll Call file photos)

Less than eight months before Election Day, the midterm landscape is still taking shape. It’s still not clear whether Democrats will have a good night (and potentially fall short of a majority) or a historic night in the House that puts them well over the top. But mounting evidence nationally and at the district level points to a Democratic advantage in a growing number of seats.

Democratic prospects improved in a handful of seats in Pennsylvania, thanks to a new, court-ordered map. And the party’s successes in state and local elections over the last 14 months demonstrate a surge in Democratic voters, particularly in blue areas, that could be problematic for Republican candidates in the fall. GOP incumbents in districts Hillary Clinton carried in 2016 might be particularly susceptible to increased Democratic enthusiasm.

Congressional Offices Announced as Democracy Award Finalists to Help Establish Trust in Congress
Congressional Management Foundation picks finalists in four categories

Arizona Rep. David Schweikert and Washington Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers, right, are among the finalists. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

To try to “restore a little faith” in Congress, the Congressional Management Foundation on Friday announced the finalists for its first Democracy Awards.

The organization chose its finalists for their focus on constituent services, their workplace environment, innovation, and transparency.

At the Races: Who Says You Can’t Go Home?
Our weekly newsletter on congressional campaigns

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This week ... Three more lawmakers retired, GOP women looked to boost their ranks and @IronStache made it to the House.

12 House Republicans Sign Letter Opposing Arctic Drilling
The proposal, not included in the House-passed tax bill, remains in the Senate version on floor

Reindeer wander off at the end of the Senate Democrats’ news conference and rally opposing drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge at the Capitol on Thursday. A number of activists dressed up as polar bears and reindeer for the event. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

A dozen House Republicans, half of whom voted for the House tax overhaul bill that passed Nov. 13, wrote a letter to GOP leaders urging them not to allow oil drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, adding another complication to negotiating a tax bill that can pass both chambers.

The Senate tax overhaul bill is tied in a reconciliation measure with legislation that would open up drilling parts of the ANWR. Its inclusion is seen as key to having secured GOP Alaska Sen. Lisa Murkowski’s support for the measure.

In GOP Retirements, Some See an Omen
As the Ways and Means exodus continues, observers wonder what it means for tax overhaul

Rep. Dave Reichert, shown here in 2015, is one of seven Republicans on the powerful Ways and Means Committee who have announced they will leave Congress or retire. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The departure of key Ways and Means Republicans could be a sign of diminished optimism for major legislative achievements, but some GOP observers say it may actually signal confidence about getting a landmark tax bill signed into law.

Six Republicans on the powerful committee with broad sway over taxes, health care and trade are running for higher office or planning to retire at the end of this term while the GOP is at the height of its power in Washington.