Delaware

‘Zero Tolerance’ Remains in Effect as First Lady Visits Migrant Kids
POTUS says one thing about prosecutions, newspaper another, DOJ something else

First lady Melania Trump smiles after signing a welcome poster made for her at the Upbring New Hope Childrens Center operated by Lutheran Social Services of the South and contracted with the Department of Health and Human Services June 21, 2018 in McAllen, Texas. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

The White House policy prosecuting all adults who enter the United States illegally remains in place even if they arrive with children, President Donald Trump said as his wife defiantly toured a southern border detention center.

Trump defended the “zero tolerance” policy at the conclusion of a Cabinet meeting at the White House amid confusion about the status of the program and the fates of detained migrant families.

At the Races: The Fight for the Forgotten Borough
Our weekly newsletter on congressional campaigns

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Welcome to At the Races! You can keep track of House and Senate races with this weekly newsletter by subscribing here. We want to hear what you think. Email us at attheraces@cqrollcall.com with your questions, tips or candidate sightings. —Simone Pathé and Bridget Bowman

Analysis: Migrants, ‘Rocket Man’ and Trump’s Ever-Changing Mind
Executive order another contradictory move in an ever-changing presidency

President Donald Trump speaks to reporters as he arrives at the Capitol for a meeting on immigration with House Republicans on Tuesday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Donald Trump is a hardliner. Until he’s not. Donald Trump is open to compromise. Until he’s not.

The president — yet again — on Thursday reversed himself on a major issue by ending his administration’s practice of separating migrant families. In doing so, he bowed to all kinds of pressure: from his wife and daughter, from human rights groups, from Democratic members — and even from his fellow Republicans.

Can Aruna Miller Upset the Largest Self-Funder in House Race History?
Maryland hopeful has many of the credentials that have boosted Democratic women this year

Maryland state Del. Aruna Miller greets voters at an early polling place in Gaithersburg, Md, on June 18. She stands behind the electioneering line which prevents a candidate from being too close to a voting site. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

GAITHERSBURG, Md. — If there’s one electoral trend from 2018 so far, it’s that Democratic women are winning primaries in House districts across the country.

But in Maryland, which has no women in its congressional delegation for the first time in more than 40 years, the most competitive woman running for the Democratic nomination in the open 6th District is at a big disadvantage.

National Children’s Museum Means Changes for Federal Triangle
Beleaguered museum looks to make third time the charm

Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, shown here in May, welcomed home the National Children’s Museum on Monday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

As the National Children’s Museum seeks to relaunch a half-block from the Mall, the Federal Triangle metro stop could get a rebranding of its own.

The museum — after years of nomadism and financial struggles — is slated to open in March, and a D.C. councilman says he will push to rename the stop.

Republican Corey Stewart Will Challenge Sen. Tim Kaine in Virginia
Former gubernatorial hopeful narrowly wins the three-way Senate primary

Virginia Sen. Tim Kaine is running for a second Senate term this year. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Corey Stewart won the Republican nomination for Senate in Virginia on Tuesday night, setting up a long-shot contest against Democratic incumbent Tim Kaine.

With 98 percent of precincts reporting, Stewart, the chairman of the Prince William County Board of Supervisors, led a three-way GOP field with 45 percent of the vote when The Associated Press called the race. State Del. Nick Freitas was in second with 43 percent. 

‘Beast’ Mode: Democrats Worry Kim Is Playing Trump
GOP is willing to give him time, but Dems see ‘unprepared’ president

President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un participate in a signing ceremony during a Tuesday meeting on Sentosa Island in Singapore. (Evan Vucci/AP)

Kim Jong Un peered inside as a Secret Service agent held open a door of “The Beast,” President Donald Trump’s heavily armored limousine. The surreal moment left some lawmakers speechless, with Democrats saying it showed Trump was too conciliatory toward the North Korean leader during their historic summit.

Trump and Kim wrapped their Singapore summit by signing a preliminary nuclear agreement Tuesday that is as sweeping as it is vague. It expresses the United States is “committed” to providing unspecified security assurances to the North and that Kim “reaffirmed his firm and unwavering commitment to complete denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula.”

Races to Watch in This Tuesday’s Primaries
Voters in five states head to the polls

South Carolina Rep. Mark Sanford faces a GOP primary challenge that’s prompted him to spend money this year. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Voters in five states head to the polls Tuesday, with most of the action in House primaries.

Republican Rep. Mark Sanford is facing a party challenge for his South Carolina seat. Nominees will be chosen in a half-dozen other competitive House races. And a new voting process will be tested in Maine.

With No D.C. Representation, Virginia and Maryland Senators Step Up for the Capitals
Senators who represent the city built on betting have no one to bet with

Flags of the Las Vegas Golden Knights and soon-to-be Las Vegas Raiders hang in Nevada Sen. Dean Heller’s office in the Hart Building on Monday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Las Vegas loves to gamble, but it’s not so easy for those who represent it this Stanley Cup final.

Members of Congress often make friendly wagers on sports championships, but so far they’ve managed only one bet on the Washington Capitals-Las Vegas Knights series. That’s because there’s only one person who represents D.C.

Republicans to Replace Tom Garrett on Ballot Saturday
Virginia congressman announced this week he would retire at end of term to deal with his alcoholism

The Virginia 5th District Republican Committee will replace retiring Rep. Tom Garrett on the ballot this Saturday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Republicans in Virginia’s 5th District will pick a nominee on Saturday to replace Rep. Tom Garrett on the ballot this November after he announced this week he would retire to deal with his alcoholism.

The 5th District Republican Committee voted 19-14 to meet Saturday to select Garrett’s replacement, The Roanoke Times reported, and will choose from a long list of candidates who have expressed interest, including state Sens. Bill Stanley and Bryce Reeves, state Del. Michael Webert, and a handful of people who work in the private sector.