gop

‘Divine Intervention’: The Congressional Baseball Game in Members' Words
 

With the first hit of the 2018 Congressional Baseball Game sending the ball right to Majority Whip Steve Scalise, who was severely injured in a shooting at the GOP baseball practice last year, members of both teams had something to be excited about at Nationals Park on Thursday. Roll Call’s Heard on the Hill reporter Alex Gangitano recaps this year's game with several players.

How the Midterms Might Affect the Congressional Baseball Lineup
 

Roll Call elections analyst Nathan L. Gonzales likes his day job covering politics, but he loves when he can combine that with his baseball hobby. With the annual Congressional Baseball Game coming up June 14, Gonzales takes a look at how a wave of retirements and competitive races in November could affect both the Democratic and GOP rosters going forward.

Below is a transcript of the video.

The History of the Congressional Baseball Game
 

What Is a Discharge Petition Anyway?
 

Senior editor David Hawkings breaks down the seldom-used House tactic that members are wielding to try to force an immigration vote to the floor: the discharge petition.

Below is a transcript of the video:

The Men Behind the Names of the 3 Senate Office Buildings
Undercover Capitol takes you inside the historic workplace — one video at a time

Senior Senate reporter Niels Lesniewski tells the story of how each of the three Senate office buildings came to be named in this week’s edition of Undercover Capitol.

Below is a transcript of the video: 

Kids, Flags, Bizarro World and the Excremental Product of a Bull: Congressional Hits and Misses
Week of May 21, 2018

Kids always get bored watching adults at work, even if that workplace happens to the U.S. House of Representatives, as Rep. Greg Walden and his pint-sized guests learned on Tuesday. See this week’s Congressional Hits and Misses for that plus flag-waving, a Superman reference and a euphemistic way of swearing during a news conference.

What’s a Senate Blue Slip and Why Is It Losing Power?
 Roll Call Decoder with David Hawkings, wonky explainers from a Capitol Hill expert

It’s a literal blue slip of paper that for decades meant a senator could block a president’s nominee to a federal judgeship in their home state. These days, however, the Senate’s blue slip might be becoming defunct. Senior editor David Hawkings explains.

Below is a transcript of the video: