Jeff Sessions

Rosenstein Removal Charges Will Only Deepen Trump-DOJ War
But deputy AG calls Times article ‘inaccurate and factually incorrect’

President Donald Trump speaks to the media as he walks across the South Lawn while departing the White House in May. On Friday, the New York Times published a piece alleging Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein wanted to tape him and use the 25th amendment to remove him from office. (Sarah Siblinger/CQ Roll Call)

ANALYSIS | Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein denies he wanted to record Donald Trump in order to gather enough dirt to remove the president via the 25th amendment. But that’s not likely to be much solace to a president who is at war with his Justice Department.

The New York Times published a story Friday afternoon detailing alleged conversations Rosenstein had in the spring of 2017 about the circus-like operations that defined the West Wing in the early months of the Trump presidency. The deputy AG had only been in the job a few weeks, but was emotional and concerned when talking about his idea of secretly taping Trump with the goal of getting enough to trigger the 25th amendment — which provides a mechanism for the vice president and Cabinet members to begin the removal of a president from the Oval Office.

Trump to Senate Judiciary on Kavanaugh Hearing: ‘Get On With It’
President says no further delays should be allowed by panel’s GOP leaders

President Donald Trump returns to the White House Wednesday  after visiting the storm-ravaged Carolinas. He was in Las Vegas on Thursday night for a campaign rally. (Win McNamee/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump has a message for Senate Democrats and Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh’s accuser about an upcoming hearing to discuss the sexual assault allegations against the judge: “Get on with it.”

“I don’t think you can delay it a little longer,” Trump said of that session during a Thursday interview with Fox News host Sean Hannity. “I have been accommodating,” he added, saying Kavanaugh’s accuser, Christine Blasey Ford, should be allowed to speak to the Senate Judiciary Committee.

Trump: ‘Decision’ Would Follow ‘Credible’ Kavanaugh Accuser Testimony
President signals willingness to reconsider nomination, also sides with accused over accuser

President Donald Trump nominates Judge Brett Kavanaugh to replace Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy in the East Room of the White House in July. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump appeared to signal he might reconsider Brett Kavanaugh’s Supreme Court nomination if his accuser is believable in potential testimony before the Senate Judiciary Committee. But he also appeared to side with the federal judge over the woman.

“Look, if she shows up and makes a credible showing, that will be very interesting and we’ll have to make a decision,” he said Wednesday as he departed the White House for the hurricane-drenched Carolinas.

Midterms Show We’re Not Any Closer to a Post-Racial America
Racially charged language is a trademark rather than a flaw to many

Florida gubernatorial candidate Ron DeSantis, a staunch ally of President Donald Trump, warned state voters not to “monkey this up” by electing his Democratic opponent, who is African-American. Above, DeSantis and Trump appear at a rally in Tampa, Fla., in July. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images file photo)

OPINION — Remember the time when Trent Lott got in a heap of trouble for remembering the time?

It was 2002, and the Senate Republican leader representing Mississippi was waxing nostalgic for what he considered the good old days at a 100th birthday celebration for South Carolina Sen. Strom Thurmond. Carried away by the moment — and in remarks that recalled similar words from 1980 — Lott said: “When Strom Thurmond ran for president, we voted for him. We’re proud of it. And if the rest of the country had followed our lead, we wouldn’t have had all these problems over all these years, either.”

On Typically Unifying 9/11, Trump Attacks His Domestic Foes
On somber anniversary, president dubs DOJ, FBI ’so terrible‘

President Donald Trump began the 17th anniversary of the 9/11 terrorist attacks by lashing out at his own political foes. (Getty Images)

Wreaths were laid and bells tolled Tuesday for the fallen in Manhattan, at the Pentagon and in a field in Pennsylvania. Officials spoke, as did Vice President Mike Pence, about “honor and remembrance.” But President Donald Trump started off the 9/11 anniversary by lashing out at his political opponents.

“For the families of the fallen and all those looking on, the cherished final moments with your loved ones … seem like yesterday. Just know that your nation understands,” Pence said at the Pentagon, striking the tone George W. Bush and Barack Obama administration officials did on Sept. 11 anniversaries past.

White House Stands By Trump Call for DOJ Search for Op-ed Writer
Sanders also blasts media, DOJ and Woodward. But Kim Jong Un gets praise

White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said President Donald Trump was right to call for a Justice Department probe into the identify of an op-ed writer. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call)

The White House on Monday doubled down on Donald Trump’s request for Attorney General Jeff Sessions to start a federal manhunt for the senior administration official who anonymously penned an op-ed blasting the president.

During Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders’ first briefing in nearly three weeks, she criticized the media, Justice Department and FBI officials and Watergate legend Bob Woodward. But North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un, who Trump last Sept. 22 called a “madman” who is “starving or killing his people,” received praise.

White House PLO Move Shows Kushner Peace Push Stalled
International Criminal Court is ‘dead to us,’ John Bolton says

Jared Kushner, President Trump’s son-in-law and senior adviser, leaves the Hart Senate Office Building after his interview with the Senate Intelligence Committee staff on Monday, July 24, 2017. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The White House signaled Monday its Jared Kushner-led Middle East peace pact has stalled, making clear it is ready to buck yet another international organization.

The administration’s move against the Palestine Liberation Organization comes as that organization is set to ask the International Criminal Court to look into some Israeli actions in the region. It also is intended to send a message to Palestinian leaders as talks toward a peace pact have made little progress.

Sessions Should Launch Probe of Anonymous Op-Ed, Trump Says
President claims national security is at risk until author is found

President Donald Trump, in the Dakotas for GOP fundraisers, made an unplanned stop in the press cabin of Air Force One on Friday. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump said Friday his Justice Department should launch an investigation into who penned an anonymous New York Times op-ed that painted him as unfit for his job.

The op-ed, penned by an unnamed government official, claimed that a large cadre of officials across the government are working hard to stifle Trump’s most extreme policy whims. It also alleged that early on, senior officials toyed with using the 25th Amendment to remove the president from office.

Cory Booker Has a Performative Streak
New Jersey Democrat has put on a show since he was a city councilman in Newark

Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J., threatens to release committee confidential documents during the start of Day 3 of Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh's confirmation hearing on Thursday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Sen. Cory Booker amped up the drama around Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh’s confirmation hearings Thursday when he passionately defended his decision to release confidential documents about the judge’s record.

Booker said he understood the consequences could be expulsion from the Senate.

Trump Attacks Bob Woodward, Warns Syria’s Assad
President calls ‘Fear: Trump in the White House’ ‘total fiction,’ tells Assad to resist using chemical weapons

President Trump is at war with a new foe, veteran journalist Bob Woodward. (Win McNamee/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump denied allegations in a coming book by journalist Bob Woodward that he directed Defense Secretary James Mattis to “kill” Syrian President Bashar al-Assad.

“That was never even contemplated, nor would it be contemplated,” the president said Wednesday.