Jerrold Nadler

Impeachment news roundup: Nov. 14
Each side’s impeachment strategy emerges in first day of hearings; Pelosi invites Trump to testify

Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, and other House Republicans conduct a news conference after the first day of impeachment inquiry public hearings on Wednesday. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

Two central figures in the new evidence linking President Donald Trump more closely to the U.S.’s request for Ukraine to investigate the president’s political rivals are scheduled to testify before lawmakers in the coming days.

Acting Ambassador to Ukraine Bill Taylor told lawmakers in the first public hearing in the impeachment inquiry on Wednesday that one of his aides overheard Trump asking Ambassador to the E.U. Gordon Sondland over the phone about the status of “the investigations” just a day after his July 25 phone call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy.

Impeachment news roundup: Nov. 12
GOP outlines Trump defense for public hearings, Mulvaney reverses course

Republicans plan to drive home the point that both Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy and President Donald Trump have said there was no pressure on the Ukrainian leader to launch an investigation into Trump’s political rivals to free up a stalled U.S. military aid package for Ukraine. (Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images file photo)

Republicans on the House Judiciary Committee sent a letter Tuesday to panel Chairman Jerrold Nadler expressing concern that Democrats have moved at such a “breakneck speed” to conduct the impeachment inquiry, members and the American people won’t have the information needed to properly consider removing President Donald Trump from office.

The GOP members requested Nadler make up for “procedural shortfalls” in the House Intelligence Committee-led inquiry by ensuring that Intelligence Chairman Adam Schiff transmits all evidence obtained in the inquiry to Judiciary and that the panels have an open line of communication.

White House, GOP allies shift to Clintonesque counterimpeachment message
‘Pelosi won’t bring those bills to the floor because she is infatuated with impeachment,’ WH spox says

White House counselor Kellyanne Conway and House Republican Conference Chair Liz Cheney, R-Wyo., talk as they arrive for a press conference at the Capitol on May 9. Cheney accused House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of having “neutered” the Intelligence Committee because of Democrats’ impeachment inquiry. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The White House and its Republican allies on Thursday slightly shifted their counterimpeachment messaging to one that more closely resembles that of President Bill Clinton’s West Wing messaging during his own House investigation.

Former aides to the 42nd president have offered free advice to the Trump White House for several weeks, suggesting the 45th chief executive and his top administration aides focus on what President Donald Trump is still trying to accomplish to benefit Americans in their everyday lives.

House Democrats adopt rules for public impeachment proceedings
Procedures set up public hearings in Intelligence panel, deliberations on articles in Judiciary

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announces the results of the vote on a resolution outlining rules for the next phase of the impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump on Thursday. (Erin Schaff/The New York Times/Pool)

House Democrats adopted a resolution Thursday adopting procedures that will govern the public portion of their impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump, but no Republicans joined them in supporting the measure despite requesting the probe be conducted transparently. 

In a rare move for the speaker showing the seriousness of the vote, Nancy Pelosi presided over the chamber as the House adopted the resolution, 232-196. 

Nunes to move from supporting to leading role in Trump impeachment defense
Top Republican on Intelligence panel will be in spotlight during public hearings after taking back seat in closed depositions

House Intelligence ranking member Devin Nunes leaves a closed-door deposition related to the House’s impeachment inquiry on Oct. 16. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Intelligence ranking member Devin Nunes will soon shift from the passenger to the driver’s seat in the Republican defense of President Donald Trump as the House enters the public hearing portion of its impeachment inquiry next month.

Nunes, a nine-term California Republican who’s developed a distaste for the media in recent years as he’s become a staunch defender of the president, has taken a low-key role in the impeachment inquiry compared to House Oversight ranking member Jim Jordan, a Trump ally who is more friendly with the press.

Democrats seize advantages in proposed impeachment rules
House Republicans raising complaints ahead of vote

House Intelligence Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calf., left, and Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., would get significant power over public impeachment hearings under the Democrats’ proposed rules. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Democrats dealt themselves several advantages inside the rules for the public portion of the impeachment inquiry, which could have big implications for the speed and perceived fairness of the proceedings.

Under those rules, President Donald Trump’s lawyers couldn’t participate in the high-profile House Intelligence Committee hearings about the president’s dealings with Ukraine that are now central to the inquiry — and aren’t guaranteed a chance to later ask those witnesses questions or object to their testimony.

Impeachment news roundup: Oct 30
More testimony about Giuliani’s involvement in Ukraine; Gaetz files ethics complain against Schiff

Catherine Croft, a State Department Ukraine specialist, arrives Wednesday for a closed-door deposition in the Capitol as part of the House's impeachment inquiry. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

A current State Department official and a former one are slated to testify Wednesday to provide more context and corroborate details from other witnesses about the Trump administration’s policy toward Ukraine, including ex-national security adviser John Bolton’s wariness of the president’s personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani.

Catherine Croft, special adviser for Ukraine at the State Department and a former national security council expert on Ukraine, began her testimony around midday Wednesday, according to an official working on the impeachment inquiry. Christopher Anderson, an assistant to former special envoy to Ukraine Kurt Volker and Croft's predecessor at State, is also expected to appear in closed session Wednesday.

Impeachment rights for Trump include loophole for Democrats to take them away
Nadler can deny president and his counsel ability to call or question witnesses, if they block others from testifying

House Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler, center, speaks at a July news conference with Intelligence Chairman Adam B. Schiff and Speaker Nancy Pelosi. The Democrats released rules Tuesday giving the president the ability to participate in House Judiciary’s impeachment proceedings but with a loophole to take those rights away. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Democrats are playing hardball with President Donald Trump. They released procedures Tuesday to allow him and his counsel to participate in the eventual Judiciary Committee portion of the impeachment inquiry, but tucked in a provision that would allow them to take away all the rights they’re granting him.

Under the House Judiciary procedures, Trump and his counsel will be invited to attend all panel proceedings and ask questions. They can also request additional evidence or witness testimony, but the “committee shall determine whether the suggested evidence is necessary or desirable.”

House Judiciary demands disclosure of grand jury materials
Panel says delay would cause ’severe harm’ as information is essential to impeachment investigation

House Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler, right, arrives at Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s office for a meeting of House chairmen discussing impeachment on Sept. 24. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The House Judiciary Committee told a judge Tuesday that a delay in receiving grand jury materials from former Special Counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s investigation would cause “severe harm” to the committee and the public because the information is essential to the House’s ongoing impeachment investigation.

The filing was among a flurry of court activity that started when Chief Judge Beryl A. Howell of the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia on Friday ordered the Justice Department to give the information to the committee. She gave them until Wednesday to do so.

Judge backs House Judiciary in ruling on Mueller materials
Grand jury information is key to Trump impeachment probe, panel has argued

House Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler said Judge Beryl A. Howell's ruling “recognizes that our impeachment inquiry fully comports with the Constitution and thoroughly rejects the spurious White House claims to the contrary.” (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A federal judge on Friday granted the House Judiciary Committee’s request for grand jury materials from former Special Counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s investigation — and in the process backed up some Democratic arguments about their power in the impeachment inquiry.

Chief Judge Beryl A. Howell of the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia, in a 75-page ruling, ordered the Justice Department to turn over the documents by Wednesday. The Department is likely to appeal.