Jerrold Nadler

Rep. Nadler appears to ‘almost pass out,’ gets medical help at event
The New York Rep. was at a press conference with New York Mayor Bill de Blasio

Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., talks to the media after the last vote before the Memorial Day recess at the Capitol in Washington on Thursday May 23, 2019. On Friday at a New York event with New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio he appeared to almost pass out. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

House Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler came close to collapse in his home state of New York while attending an event with Mayor Bill de Blasio.

At a Friday press conference in New York City, de Blasio came to Nadler’s aid, offering water and making sure the fellow Democrat was feeling alright. The press conference was held at P.S. 199 in the Upper West Side of Manhattan. 

Photos of the Week: Pre-Memorial Day weekend edition
The week of May 20 as captured by Roll Call’s photojournalists

Former vice president and current Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden tosses his jacket as he arrives for his 2020 campaign kickoff rally in Philadelphia  on Saturday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

We started off the week with politicians throwing articles of clothing from the stage, and wrapped it up with a tornado warning in Washington.

Democratic Caucus oversight discussion does little to resolve impeachment divisions
Some members still want to press ahead, while others still aren’t convinced impeachment is best path

House Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., departs Wednesday after meeting with House Democrats to discuss possible impeachment proceedings against President Donald Trump. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

Updated 2:11 p.m. | A Wednesday morning discussion by House Democrats on oversight matters did little to resolve a stewing intraparty debate about whether to open an impeachment inquiry against Donald Trump, but it did set off the president.

Speaker Nancy Pelosi organized the meeting to continue to hold her caucus back from heading down an impeachment path with an unknown outcome that could backfire on her party. As she left the discussion to go to the White House to meet with Trump on infrastructure, she had harsh words for the president.

Hope Hicks, Ann Donaldson the latest ex-Trump officials to get subpoenas

Hope Hicks, former communications director for President Donald Trump, was subpoenaed by the House Judiciary Committee, along with Ann Donaldson, a former aide for Don McGahn. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Former White House Communications Director Hope Hicks and Ann Donaldson, the former chief of staff for ex-White House Counsel Don McGahn, were issued subpoenas Tuesday to provide documents and testimony to the House Judiciary Committee for its probe into corruption and obstruction by President Donald Trump and his associates.

Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., sent Hicks and Donaldson document requests on March 4, but the requested materials were never furnished.

Democrats divided over whether it’s time to open impeachment inquiry
Caucus to discuss the matter during a special meeting Wednesday

Rep. John Yarmuth of Kentucky is among the Democrats who do not think it is quite time to begin impeachment proceedings against President Donald Trump. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

Updated 2:50 p.m. | House Democrats are divided over whether they should open an impeachment inquiry against President Donald Trump, with top leaders still hesitant to do so even as more rank-and-file members say it’s time.

Speaker Nancy Pelosi has called a special caucus meeting Wednesday morning to discuss oversight matters, including the impeachment question, several members said.

Nadler prepares contempt vote for McGahn — but what are the consequences?
The White House argued McGahn has ‘absolute immunity’ and isn’t legally required to comply with a congressional subpoena

Then-White House counsel Don McGahn listens to testimony at the Senate Judiciary Committee’s Supreme Court confirmation hearing for Brett Kavanaugh in Hart Building in September. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler is preparing a committee vote to hold former White House counsel Don McGahn in contempt of Congress, the second Trump official to get such treatment for defying one of Nadler’s subpoenas to testify about the special counsel investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election.

“Let me be clear: this Committee will hear Mr. McGahn’s testimony, even if we have to go to court to secure it. We will not allow the President to prevent the American people from hearing from this witness,” Nadler said at a hearing Tuesday for McGahn that the former White House lawyer skipped per the administration’s orders.

A Don McGahn no-show could be turning point on impeachment
Members of leadership starting to speak more directly of proceedings

Rep. David Cicilline, D-R.I., is ready to start impeachment proceedings if the White House continues to block testimony of former aides like Don McGahn. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Rep. David Cicilline, a member of House Democratic leadership who serves on the Judiciary Committee, said that if former White House counsel Don McGahn does not testify Tuesday, the panel should open an impeachment inquiry against President Donald Trump.

And the Rhode Island Democrat, who cited “a pattern from the White House to impede our investigation,” is not alone in the leadership ranks. 

White House gets back-up from DOJ on Don McGahn testimony stance

The White House says former White House counsel Don McGahn does not have to testify, according to an internal DOJ memo. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump Monday ordered former White House Counsel Don McGahn to not testify at a House Judiciary Committee hearing scheduled for Tuesday, with the administration saying the former adviser has “absolute immunity” and is not legally required to comply with a congressional subpoena.

The move was not unexpected as part of Trump’s “oppose-all-the-subpoenas” stance since the conclusion of the special counsel investigation last month. But it further escalates the separation-of-powers showdown between the Trump administration and congressional oversight.

Where all 24 House Judiciary Democrats stand on impeachment
Majority says that may eventually need to launch an impeachment inquiry to get information

From left, Reps. Joe Neguse, Sylvia R. Garcia, Mary Gay Scanlon, Lou Correa and Val B. Demings attend a House Judiciary markup May 8. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

More than half of the Democrats on the House Judiciary Committee say their panel may eventually need to open an impeachment inquiry against President Donald Trump if his administration’s efforts to stonewall congressional investigations continue.

CQ Roll Call talked to all but one of the 24 Democrats on the panel over the past two weeks about their views on impeachment in light of Trump, his administration and his allies deciding not to cooperate with their investigation into potential obstruction of justice, corruption and abuses of power. The Democrat not reached directly, California’s Eric Swalwell, a presidential candidate, weighed in on Twitter.

Judiciary Democrats may ask full House to formally approve their investigation into Trump
Jackson Lee says she thinks it is time for a resolution of investigation

Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee, D-Texas, says House Judiciary Committee Democrats may file a resolution of investigation to have the full House vote to approve the panel's probe into potential obstruction of justice and abuses of power by the Trump administration. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Some Judiciary Committee Democrats, concerned about the Trump administration escalating its stonewalling into their investigation of potential obstruction of justice and abuses of power by the president and his associates, want the full House to approve their probe. 

“I believe we are at a point now that we should issue a resolution of investigation,” senior Judiciary member Shelia Jackson Lee said Thursday.