Joe Manchin III

Here’s the List of Senate Republican and Democratic Leaders
Status quo reigns (mostly)

Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., prepares to address the media after the Senate Policy lunches in the Capitol on March 20. Sens. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., center, and Richard J. Durbin, D-Ill., also appear. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Richard Ojeda, West Virginia’s Trump-voting Democrat, Announces Presidential Bid
Retired army major lost his bid for 3rd District last week

State Sen. Richard Ojeda lost his bid for the 3rd District by nearly 13 points last week. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call file photo)

On the heels of his losing congressional bid in West Virginia, state Sen. Richard Ojeda has filed to run for the Democratic nomination for president.

Speaking to his supporters via Facebook Live from the National Mall in Washington, D.C. on Monday afternoon, Ojeda laid out an anti-corruption platform and promised to fight for the working class.

Two Electorates, Two Outcomes
Consensus, bipartisanship could be in short supply

The 2018 midterm showed the divided electorate with its divided outcome. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

It’s rare that both parties can celebrate after an election, but that’s exactly the situation after Republicans gained a handful of Senate seats and Democrats picked up around 30 House seats Tuesday night.

Conservatives, white men (particularly those without a college degree) and pro-Trump voters backed GOP nominees, while women (particularly those with a college degree), minorities and younger voters lined up overwhelmingly behind the Democrats.

The Candidates Mattered. But Opinions About Trump Mattered More
Different outcomes in the House and Senate mostly about the president

Democratic Sens. Heidi Heitkamp and Joe Donnelly both lost their bids for second terms Tuesday night. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Both parties had something to celebrate after Tuesday’s midterm elections, depending on where they looked. But that split outcome — with Democrats winning the House, and Republicans gaining seats in the Senate — underscores the extent to which opinions about President Donald Trump shape today’s politics.

Republicans largely prevailed at the Senate level because they were running in red states where President Donald Trump performed well in 2016. The House saw the opposite outcome, but the reason was the same. Republicans largely struggled because they were running in places where Trump was unpopular.

Republicans Maintain Senate Control
Democrats lose seats in Indiana, North Dakota and Missouri

Senate Republicans, led by Mitch McConnell, have retained their control of the chamber after the 2018 midterms. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Republicans will maintain control of the Senate, but it is still unclear by how narrow a margin.

The Associated Press projects the chamber will remain in Republican hands, with a Democratic takeover blocked after losses in Indiana and North Dakota. Things got worse for Democrats later in the night when they lost Missouri, too. 

West Virginia’s Joe Manchin Stays Put in Trump Country
Embattled Democrat played up his willingness to work with the president and buck his own party

Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., holds Ava Lott, the 2018 Ripley 4th of July Wee Miss, before a parade.  (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call)

Democratic Sen. Joe Manchin has won re-election in West Virginia in the heart of Trump country, dispatching Republican state Attorney General Patrick Morissey.

With 69 percent of precincts reporting, Manchin led Morrisey 50 percent to 46 percent when The Associated Press called the race.

Democrats Start the Party as Jennifer Wexton Flips Virginia Seat
As the results rolled in, Democrats in Dulles snapped pictures of the TV screen

Jennifer Wexton delivers her victory speech on election night after defeating Rep. Barbara Comstock, R-Va., for Virginia's 10th district seat on Tuesday, Nov. 6. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

DULLES, Va. — Hundreds of energetic Democrats spilled into the ballroom where Jennifer Wexton is holding her election night party in Virginia’s 10th District.

It turned into a victory celebration even faster than many had hoped. CNN declared it a win for Wexton well before 8 p.m., projecting she would unseat Rep. Barbara Comstock in one of the first red-to-blue flips of the night as Democrats aim to take back the House.

5 Things That Defined the Fight for the Senate
Democrats still largely on defense, but battlefield shifted some this cycle

Former state Rep. Mike Braun defeated two congressmen in the Indiana Senate Republican primary. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The battle over Supreme Court Justice Brett M. Kavanaugh’s confirmation threw a wildcard into the race for Senate control. But the contours of the fight for the chamber aren’t much different from a year ago: Democrats running for re-election in states President Donald Trump carried by wide margins in 2016 are in trouble heading into Election Day.

Democrats are defending 26 seats — 10 of them in states that backed Trump — while Republicans are only defending nine. Given that imbalance, it’s no surprise that Trump’s effect on Senate races has been different from his influence on the fight for control of the House, where he’s put GOP incumbents on defense.

A Definitive Ranking of Midterm Celebrity Stumpers
Actors, singers and sports legends got involved in 2018. But how much did they really do?

Democratic candidate for U.S. Senate from Texas Rep. Beto O'Rourke joins Willie Nelson on stage during his Turn out For Texas Rally, featuring a concert by Wille Nelson, in Austin, Texas on Saturday, Sept. 29, 2018. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

If an Instagram post falls in the middle of election, does it make a sound?

Celebrities got a lot of credit for their political moonlighting this campaign cycle, from Beto-mania to … well, Beto-mania. But let’s be honest: How much did they really do?

Roll Call on the Road: The 2018 Midterms in Pictures
Our photographers traveled the country to cover the 2018 campaigns

Harley Rouda, a Democrat running in California’s 48th District, speaks with supporters on May 20 during a campaign rally in Laguna Beach, Calif. Rouda later advanced to the general election against GOP Rep. Dana Rohrabacher. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Roll Call photographers have traveled from Maryland to California and Texas to Montana to capture images of the midterm campaigns.