Lois Frankel

Congressional leaders remember Parkland shooting anniversary
Lawmakers mark one year since the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School

Students and supporters protest against gun violence with a lie-in outside the White House in February last year, after 17 people were killed in a shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Lawmakers commemorated the victims of the mass shooting in Parkland, Florida, on Thursday, one year to the date of the tragedy.

Seventeen people were killed and 14  wounded in the massacre at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School on Feb. 14 last year. 

‘It’s weird you’re bringing this up:’ Trump SOTU shoutout highlights disparity between Democratic and GOP women

Republican women know there is work to be done for more women to run and win elections. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The dearth of Republican women in Congress was in the spotlight at the State of the Union when President Donald Trump praised the historic gains made in the 116th Congress, gains driven by Democratic victories and GOP losses.

The number of House Republican women slipped in 2019 down from 23 in the previous congress to 13 now. And only one woman, Wyoming’s Liz Cheney, holds a top House leadership position in the GOP conference.

House Democrats break out their white suits for State of the Union
The party selected the color to harken back to suffragists

First row from left, Reps. Jan Schakowsky, D-Ill., Sylvia Garcia, D-Texas, Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., and Alma Adams, D-N.C., pose for a group photo Tuesday of House Democrats in the Capitol Visitor Center. They say they are wearing “suffragette white” to the State of the Union address. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

House Democrats appeared at the Capitol on Tuesday wearing white suits and dresses ahead of the State of the Union. 

The color was selected as a nod to the suffragist movement, according to Rep. Lois Frankel, chair of the Democratic Women’s Working Group.

Who won’t be at Trump’s State of the Union address
At least 4 are standing the president up, others will wear white to promote a ‘pro-woman’ agenda

Georgia Democratic Rep. John Lewis is one of at least four Democratic lawmakers to skip President Donald Trump’s State of the Union address tonight. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

At least four Democrats have openly announced they’re playing hooky for President Donald Trump’s State of the Union address tonight.

Reps. Earl Blumenauer, Hank Johnson, Steve Cohen, and John Lewis will not attend the address, Trump’s third speech to a joint session of Congress at the Capitol.

Wearing white to the State of the Union isn’t what it used to be
Democrats go for a more positive fashion statement than the one they made in 2017

Democratic women wore white to President Donald Trump’s first address to a joint session of Congress in 2017. They’re bringing back the color for his State of the Union this year to highlight their new majority’s economic agenda for women. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Democratic women plan to break out their white suits and dresses Tuesday for President Donald Trump’s State of the Union. The color may be the same, but the reason has changed.

“This is really going to be sending a message — especially to all the women and their families in the country that put us into the majority with all these new women [members] — that a big part of our agenda is going to be promoting the economic security of women and their families,” Rep. Lois Frankel, chair of the Democratic Women’s Working Group, said in an interview. 

Hakeem Jeffries Wins Democratic Caucus Chair Race Against Barbara Lee
Current DPCC co-chair moves up to No. 5 in leadership

Rep. Hakeem Jeffries, D-N.Y., won the House Democratic Caucus chairmanship on Wednesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

New York Rep. Hakeem Jeffries, whom several Democratic colleagues view as a potential future speaker, narrowly won an intraparty contest for House Democratic Caucus chair Wednesday against California Rep. Barbara Lee

The vote was 123-113. 

14 Democrats Push Back on Raising Caucus Threshold for Speaker Race
Caucus threshold should remain simple majority; members should unite behind winner, they say

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi is expected to run for speaker again. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

A group of 14 Democrats who support Nancy Pelosi for speaker are pushing back on a proposal from some of their anti-Pelosi colleagues to raise the caucus threshold for nominating a speaker candidate. 

House Democratic Caucus rules make all of their elected leadership positions subject to a simple-majority vote. Then, under House rules, the speaker nominee chosen by the caucus needs to win votes from a majority of the entire chamber — 218, if everyone is present and voting. 

Members Worry as Justice Ginsburg Is Hospitalized
RGB fractured ribs in a fall

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has been on the bench since 1993. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The news that Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg was hospitalized had members of Congress hoping for her quick recovery.

Ginsburg was admitted to George Washington Hospital with three broken ribs on her left side following a fall in her office on Wednesday night.

Florida Polls Show Andrew Gillum and Bill Nelson Ahead
Races for governor and senator appear to be intertwined

Musician Jimmy Buffett campaigns with Democratic Sen. Bill Nelson, left, and Andrew Gillum, the Democratic candidate for Florida governor, at a rally featuring a performance by Buffett in West Palm Beach on Saturday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. — How can a wildly expensive Senate campaign be an undercard?

Apparently, when you have an open-seat race for governor with a quickly emerging Democratic star running against a former congressman aligned with President Donald Trump.

Frankel, Brooks Push for Girls Education on International Day of the Girl
Bipartisan effort aims to help girls around the world stay in school

Rep. Susan W. Brooks, R-Ind., left, and Rep. Lois Frankel, D-Fla., right, co-chair the Congressional Caucus for Women’s Issues. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

In their travels around the world, Reps. Lois Frankel and Susan W. Brooks have seen firsthand the challenges girls face when it comes to getting an education. So to mark the International Day of the Girl, the two lawmakers are introducing legislation to do something about it. 

The bipartisan effort, known as the Keeping Girls in School Act, would ensure the U.S. Agency for International Development spends allocated money to keep girls in school and get more of them into secondary schools.