Zell Miller, Longtime Georgia Political Fixture and Senator, Dead at 86
Democrat made waves in Senate when he endorsed George W. Bush

Former Georgia Sen. Zell Miller, who died  Friday, gave the keynote address at both a Democratic and Republican convention. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Zell Miller, a longtime fixture of Georgia politics who came to symbolize the strange position conservative Democrats found themselves in as their party moved leftward nationally, has died. He was 86.

“My grandfather passed away peacefully surrounded by his family,” Bryan Miller, the former senator and governor’s grandson, said in a statement released Friday. “The people of Georgia have lost one of our state’s finest public servants.”

China Trade Tariffs Stir Support, Fears and Retaliation Threat
‘China is not afraid of and will not recoil from a trade war’

Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer, D-N.Y.(Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photos)

Lawmakers offered mixed reactions to the Trump administration’s decision Thursday to apply tariffs on nearly 1,300 products imported to the United States, a move Beijing responded to by announcing that it may increase tariffs on $3 billion of American goods.

China’s Commerce Ministry called on Washington to reach a negotiated settlement  “as soon as possible” but gave no deadline, The Associated Press and other news agencies reported. It said its tentative measurers were in response to the tariffs announced March 8 on steel and aluminum imports.

Vermont Will Be Last State to Have Never Sent a Woman to Congress
Cindy Hyde-Smith’s appointment marks all-time high for women in chamber

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, the first female speaker, hosted a reception last week to honor Ohio Rep. Marcy Kaptur, who is now the longest-serving woman in the House, breaking the previous record set by Massachusetts Rep. Edith Nourse Rogers. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The Mississippi governor’s appointment of Cindy Hyde-Smith to the Senate next month marks a milestone: She will be the state’s first woman in Congress.

And that would leave Vermont as the lone state in the union to have never sent a female lawmaker to Washington

House GOP Renews ‘Holman Rule’ Targeting Federal Pay
Provision allows cuts to individual employee salaries

Rep. Morgan Griffith of Virginia, shown here in 2015, proposed a Holman rule amendment in July that aimed to slash a section of the Congressional Budget Office. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Republican leaders on Tuesday re-upped a rule that lets lawmakers slash the salaries of individual federal employees, in a move that some Democrats condemned as an attempt to dismantle the federal workforce.

Tucked into a floor rule that teed up consideration of two unrelated bills on financial services and health policy is a provision that extends the “Holman rule,” a standing order whose revival has sparked controversy in recent years. 

Democrats Notching Key Legislative Victories Ahead of Elections
Members hope achievements can drive support among voters in rural states

Montana Sen. Jon Tester, is one of several moderate Democrats in the chamber who have notched key legislative victories under President Donald Trump. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Moderate Senate Democrats on the ballot in 2018 are racking up a number of key legislative victories in advance of what is expected to be a bitter midterm election cycle.

The successes, on bills ranging from veterans’ issues to bank regulation and tax credits for so-called clean coal technology, are the kind that can drive support among voters in the rural states that many of these members call home.

Boston Radio Host Tried to Test Sen. Elizabeth Warren’s DNA in 2012
Warren has defied calls to get DNA tested to prove Native American ancestry

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., holds a news conference in the Capitol on banking deregulation legislation on March 6. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

As liberals and conservatives alike call for Sen. Elizabeth Warren to test her DNA for Native American heritage, one man has already tried.

Six years ago, conservative Boston radio host Howie Carr obtained the cap of a pen Warren chewed on at a book signing and submitted it to a lab for testing.

Congress to Explore Sexual Harassment in the Service Industry
Bipartisan Congressional Caucus for Women’s Issues hosting hearing Monday

Rep. Lois Frankel, D-Fla., says for women working in the service industry, “quitting is not an option.” (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Congress wants to take a harder look at victims of sexual harassment who don’t have much clout.

The bipartisan Congressional Caucus for Women’s Issues is hosting a hearing, “Beyond the Headlines: Combating Service Sector Sexual Harassment in the Age of #MeToo” on Monday.

Democrats Put Farm Bill Talks on Hold
Minority party says it can’t negotiate until it sees text and other info

House Agriculture ranking Democrat Collin C. Peterson says his party is done talking about the farm bill until the majority Republicans start sharing information. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

For those tracking the farm bill, the top question this week is whether the House Agriculture Committee chairman and ranking member can reopen talks that stalled last week, after Democrats balked at possible cuts to the food stamp program.

Rep. Collin C. Peterson, the top committee Democrat, said Thursday he would heed his colleagues’ request that he stop negotiations until Chairman K. Michael Conaway gives members the text of the proposed farm bill, along with Congressional Budget Office cost estimates and impact assessments.

Podcast: Banking Deregulation in the Air
CQ on Congress, Episode 95

Sens. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., left, and Heidi Heitkamp, D-N.D., are on opposite sides of a push to relax the Dodd-Frank law passed after the 2008 financial crisis. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

CQ banking reporter Doug Sword explains the state of play as Republicans (and some Democrats) try to relax banking regulations enacted during the Obama administration to safeguard against a repeat of the 2008 financial meltdown.

Jim McGovern Most Likely to Take Over for Slaughter on Rules Panel
Massachusetts Democrat to serve acting ranking member until Pelosi names successor

Ranking member Louise Slaughter and Massachusetts Rep. Jim McGovern confer before a House Rules hearing in the Capitol in July 2014. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

After House Rules ranking member Louise Slaughter’s death, Rep. Jim McGovern will take over her committee post in an acting capacity, and remains the most likely candidate to succeed her. 

The Massachusetts Democrat was the second-highest-ranking Democrat on Rules behind Slaughter. McGovern’s seniority grants him the opportunity to serve as acting ranking member in her absence, as he did this week while she was in the hospital for a concussion. Slaughter, 88, the first woman to head the Rules panel, died Friday