Maxine Waters

Democrats’ next move unclear after approving subpoena lawsuits
Resolution is House’s broadest step so far in response to Trump’s ‘oppose-all-the-subpoenas’ strategy

Rep. Jamie Raskin, D-Md., second from left, says the resolution approved Tuesday, which gives committees the authority to take Trump administration officials to court quickly, had a broader purpose than just getting to court to get documents related to the Mueller probe. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Updated 7:13 p.m. | House Democrats voted Tuesday to bolster their oversight power by giving committees the authority to take Trump administration officials to court quickly, but it did little to settle broader questions in a caucus that is trying to balance competing political and legal strategies ahead of the 2020 elections.

The resolution becomes the House’s broadest step in response to President Donald Trump’s “oppose-all-the-subpoenas” strategy, because it allows the Democrats to skip the floor process to enforce committee subpoenas through the federal courts.

Tlaib wants Democrats pushing impeachment to ‘turn words into action’
Freshman congresswoman asking colleagues who want to impeach Trump to sign her resolution

Rep. Rashida Tlaib, D-Mich., speaks to reporters after a coalition of advocacy groups delivered more than 10 million petition signatures to Congress earlier this month urging the House to start impeachment proceedings against President Donald Trump. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Rep. Rashida Tlaib is calling on Democrats to “turn words into action” by signing onto her resolution directing the House committee in charge of impeachment to consider formally trying the president for wrongdoing.

At least 34 Democrats in the House have voiced support for impeachment. But just nine of those have cosponsored Tlaib’s resolution directing the House Judiciary Committee to inquire whether or not the Democratic-controlled chamber should impeach President Donald Trump. 

‘Reluctant impeachment’: Will Pelosi ever be swayed to go there?
Democrats understand the speaker’s cautious approach to impeachment but believe she can be convinced

Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., leaves a House Democratic Caucus meeting Wednesday, May 22, 2019 in which her members debated whether it’s time to open an impeachment inquiry. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Will Speaker Nancy Pelosi ever come to a point where she is ready to lead her caucus in opening an impeachment inquiry against President Donald Trump?

The California Democrat hasn’t ruled it out, despite strong signals she wants to avoid the divisive move and let the voters decide in 2020 whether to punish Trump for his alleged misdeeds. 

Democratic Caucus oversight discussion does little to resolve impeachment divisions
Some members still want to press ahead, while others still aren’t convinced impeachment is best path

House Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., departs Wednesday after meeting with House Democrats to discuss possible impeachment proceedings against President Donald Trump. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

Updated 2:11 p.m. | A Wednesday morning discussion by House Democrats on oversight matters did little to resolve a stewing intraparty debate about whether to open an impeachment inquiry against Donald Trump, but it did set off the president.

Speaker Nancy Pelosi organized the meeting to continue to hold her caucus back from heading down an impeachment path with an unknown outcome that could backfire on her party. As she left the discussion to go to the White House to meet with Trump on infrastructure, she had harsh words for the president.

Here are the Democrats who are pushing for Trump’s impeachment
More join chorus calling for impeachment after Mueller’s statement on his Russia investigation

Speaker Nancy Pelosi has cautioned her caucus that rushing into starting impeachment proceedings against President Donald Trump could derail the party’s agenda in the House. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Updated 5/31, 12:50 p.m.

More Democrats are backing impeachment proceedings against President Donald Trump after Special Counsel Robert S. Mueller III delivered a statement Wednesday on his report on investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 election. Three presidential candidates — Sens. Kamala Harris, Cory Booker and Kirsten Gillibrand joined the pro-impeachment caucus this week even as House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has tried to quiet the growing call in her party.

Democrats divided over whether it’s time to open impeachment inquiry
Caucus to discuss the matter during a special meeting Wednesday

Rep. John Yarmuth of Kentucky is among the Democrats who do not think it is quite time to begin impeachment proceedings against President Donald Trump. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

Updated 2:50 p.m. | House Democrats are divided over whether they should open an impeachment inquiry against President Donald Trump, with top leaders still hesitant to do so even as more rank-and-file members say it’s time.

Speaker Nancy Pelosi has called a special caucus meeting Wednesday morning to discuss oversight matters, including the impeachment question, several members said.

Road ahead: Will Congress get a disaster relief deal before Memorial Day?
House and Senate will keep full schedules as budget talks continue for this week and beyond

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., and Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., will join their fellow congressional leaders to discuss the budget and the need to lift the country’s debt limit with the administration. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The big question for the week is whether Congress will actually act on long-awaited disaster relief before lawmakers head out for Memorial Day.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has said such a vote is on the floor agenda for this week, but as senators left Thursday afternoon for the weekend, there was still no final agreement on any bipartisan package.

Disney should pay workers higher wages, founder’s granddaughter says
Disney told lawmakers The Walt Disney Co.’s pay practices don’t align with “the values my family taught me

Abigail Disney speaks onstage during the 32nd Anniversary Celebrating Women Breakfast at Marriott Marquis on May 14, 2019, in New York City. On Wednesday Disney told lawmakers the Walt Disney Co.’s pay practices don’t align with “the values my family taught me.” (Monica Schipper/Getty Images for The New York Women’s Foundation)

Activist and filmmaker Abigail Disney told lawmakers The Walt Disney Co.’s pay practices don’t align with “the values my family taught me” and that the media business her grandfather built should be paying workers higher wages.

“Disney could lead once more,” said Disney — an heir to the family fortune — on Wednesday during a House Financial Services subcommittee hearing. “All it lacks, ironically, is the imagination to do so.”

Man gets 4-years for making racist threats to Obama and Rep. Waters
Stephen J. Taubert, 61, called a Capitol Police officer ‘n----r boy’ 30 times during an interview

Stephen J. Taubert threatened to “hang” U.S. President Barack Obama in a call he made to the office of then-Sen. Al Franken in 2017. (Alex Wong/Getty Images)

A U.S. District Court judge sentenced a New York man to four years in prison for making racist threats to kill President Barack Obama and Rep. Maxine Waters.

Stephen J. Taubert, 61, was found guilty in March on three felony counts for placing menacing phone calls to two congressional offices and for targeting black Democratic leaders Obama and Waters.

Family of man who made death threats to Obama, Waters pleads for leniency
The defense attorney and family of Stephen Taubert, 61, are asking that he be sentenced to home detention and probation

Rep. Gregory Meeks, D-N.Y., and Rep. Maxine Waters, D-Calif., arrive for the House Democrats’ caucus meeting in the Capitol on Nov. 15, 2018. Waters and Barack Obama received death threats from New York man, Stephen Taubert, 61. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The family and defense attorney of a New York man convicted of threatening to kill President Barack Obama and Rep. Maxine Waters is asking that he be sentenced to home detention and probation.

Stephen Taubert, 61, was found guilty in March of targeting prominent black Democratic leaders Obama and Waters due to their race. But he does not have a history of violence, and the threats were just words, his family and defense team said, according to Syracuse.com. Relatives wrote that he “likes to provoke” and believes the First Amendment allows him to say anything he wants.