Mike Pompeo

3 Things to Watch: Kim lets Trump know their ‘mysteriously wonderful’ chemistry isn’t enough
‘There is no sign he’s stopped producing missiles,’ analyst says of North Korean strongman

South Koreans watch coverage of President Donald Trump meeting with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un during their summit in Hanoi, Vietnam, before talks collapsed. (Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images file photo)

ANALYSIS President Donald Trump once claimed he and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un “fell in love.” But the dictator he once called “Little Rocket Man” let him know on Friday that their “mysteriously wonderful” relationship might not be enough to strike a disarmament pact.

As recently as Wednesday, the U.S. commander in chief signaled he continues to believe the unlikely warm relationship with Kim could drive a deal under which Kim would give up his nuclear arms.

Trump shifts expectations on North Korea nuclear deal, again
‘We’ll let you know in about a year,’ POTUS says of reported missile test facility rebuild

President Donald Trump again expressed frustration with North Korea over alleged work on a missile test facility, violating a promise he says Kim Jong Un made during their first summit. (Win McNamee/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump on Thursday again downgraded expectations for a nuclear disarmament deal with North Korea, saying it could be a year before U.S. officials know if Kim Jong Un is serious about shutting down his weapons programs.

White House officials have been scrambling to respond to a media report that Kim is rebuilding a missile testing facility, a move that contradicts his pledge to hold off on nuclear and missile tests while engaged with the Trump administration about giving up that program and his nuclear weapons.

Among the ‘Jewish groups’ Trump cites, one with neo-Nazi ties
Two organizations calling for Rep. Ilhan Omar to resign from the Foreign Affairs Committee have been described as ‘anti-Muslim hate groups’

Rep. Ilhan Omar, D-Minn., and Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., conduct a news conference in the Capitol to introduce a legislative package that would lower prescription drug prices in the U.S. on Jan. 10. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump pushed for congressional leaders to unseat Rep. Ilhan Omar from the House Foreign Affairs Committee this week by citing a letter signed by organizations he described as “Jewish groups” calling for her removal.

But the coalition behind the letter — described by conservative media to be “leading Jewish organizations” — includes groups that maintain no relationship to the American Jewish community and peddle anti-Muslim conspiracy theories.

Menendez blocks firearm export rule, citing oversight concerns
The proposed Trump administration rule would weaken oversight and make it easier for criminals to obtain military-grade weapons, he said

Sen. Bob Menendez, D-N.J., arrives in the Capitol for a vote on Wednesday, Oct. 10, 2018. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A senior Democratic senator has blocked a Trump administration proposed rule to switch oversight authority of firearm sales abroad from the State Department to the Commerce Department, arguing the move would significantly weaken congressional oversight and increase the risk of terrorists and criminals getting their hands on powerful military-grade weapons.

Sen. Robert Menendez, ranking member on the Foreign Relations Committee, placed the hold last week after he was notified earlier this month about the proposed change by the State Department. Menendez is objecting to the final language of the rule.

3 takeaways: Trump-Kim collapse ‘a breakdown that ... didn’t need to happen’
What now? Analysts see difficult path to a deal — and a distracted U.S. president

President Donald Trump speaks at a news conference Thursday while Mike Pompeo, U.S. secretary of state, looks on following his second summit meeting with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. They failed to reach a deal or iron out long-unresolved issues. (Tuan Mark/Getty Images)

ANALYSIS — The table was set for a working lunch inside a posh Hanoi hotel, silverware wrapped in carefully folded napkins atop yellow plates flanked by flowers placed on a long rectangular table. But President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un never stepped foot in the room — and their path to a deal is newly murky.

Reporters in Vietnam for the duo’s second nuclear disarmament summit were positioned on one side of the room, some tweeting pictures of the lunch table as they waited. Soon came this dispatch from the day’s print pooler, David Nakamura of the Washington Post, quoting a White House spokeswoman: “There has been a program change.”

No deal: Trump says he ‘had to walk away’ over impasse with Kim on sanctions
White House signals denuclearization talks with North Korea will continue

South Koreans at Seoul Railway Station watch a screen showing President Donald Trump meeting with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un on Wednesday. (Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un failed to reach a nuclear disarmament deal due to an impasse over sanctions on the reclusive Asian country.

“Basically, they wanted the sanctions lifted in their entirety, but we couldn’t do that,” Trump told reporters in Hanoi. “We had to walk away from it.” (The president wrote in his book “The Art of the Deal” that one must know when to leave negotiations, saying exiting can bring the other side back to the table with more favorable terms.)

Meet the new Senate Foreign Relations boss, not the same as the old boss
Jim Risch says he speaks regularly with the president, but does not air laundry

Sen.  Jim Risch, R-Idaho, left, is the new chairman of the Foreign Relations Committee, working with ranking member Sen. Robert Menendez, D-N.J. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Contrary to past practice, when the new chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee has a disagreement with President Donald Trump, the public might not hear about it.

But Sen. Jim Risch says that the president himself certainly does — often from the chairman himself.

Engel promises tough oversight of Trump's North Korea nuclear talks
House Democrats are ready for a deal, but only if it offers permanent denuclearization

House Foreign Affairs Chairman Eliot Engel, D-N.Y., participates in the House Democrats’ news conference on the “NATO Support Act” before its consideration on the House floor on Tuesday, Jan. 22, 2019. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Trump administration must be more transparent about its North Korea policy if it wants congressional support for implementing any nuclear agreement that could come out of this week’s summit in Hanoi, the chairman of the House Foreign Affairs Committee said Monday.

Chairman Eliot L. Engel, D-N.Y., said House Democrats are ready to be constructive partners in implementing a possible U.S.-North Korea nuclear deal, but only if it offers a credible path toward Pyongyang’s permanent denuclearization.

Mike Pompeo says he is not running for Senate in Kansas in 2020
Former congressman says he will be secretary of State as long as Trump wants him in that role

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said a 2020 campaign for Senate in Kansas is “ruled out.” (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said Thursday that he was ruling out running for Senate in Kansas in 2020 — at least as long as he is still the top diplomat.

“I love Kansas. I’m going to be the secretary of State as long as President Trump gives me the opportunity to serve as America’s senior diplomat,” Pompeo told NBC’s “Today Show” when asked about a possible race for the seat being vacated by the retirement of Sen. Pat Roberts.

After contentious border moves, stakes only get higher for Trump
‘The real rough water for President Trump still lies ahead,’ GOP insider says

South Koreans watch on a screen at the Seoul Railway Station on June 12, 2018, showing President Donald Trump meeting with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. (Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images file photo)

ANALYSIS — “Stay tuned” is a common refrain from White House aides when asked about the many cliffhangers created by President Donald Trump. But remarkably, even after three topsy-turvy months that culminated Friday in a wild Rose Garden appearance, that West Wing mantra will apply doubly over the next few weeks.

Trump’s decision to declare a national emergency at the southern border to unlock Pentagon funds for his proposed border wall came wrapped in an announcement press conference during which he veered from topic to topic, undercut his own legal position, often appeared dispassionate when discussing the emergency declaration, and made more baseless claims. That matter is already embroiled in court fights, putting perhaps his biggest campaign promise in legal limbo, and has appeared to created new distance between him and some Senate Republicans.