nkw1

Facebook feud: GOP Rep. Peter King, faces lawsuit threat over blocking constituents
The New York Civil Liberties Union said it plans to sue King if he does not unblock roughly 70 people

Rep. Peter King, R-N.Y., has blocked about 70 people from commenting on his campaign committee’s Facebook page, a civil rights organization said. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

When Rep. Peter King congratulated former ExxonMobil CEO Rex Tillerson on his appointment to secretary of state on Facebook, a constituent responded by posting a link to donations the oil company made to King and other federal lawmakers.

“Money talks, anyone wondering why [t]he Congressman is not expressing any concern or doubt need look no further,” the constituent wrote.

How a Republican border trip amplified a bogus tuberculosis rumor
Local public health officials quickly debunked rumors of an outbreak

US Army Ranger helps his unit erect a chain-link fence that will be topping with barbed wire parallel to the primary steel US/Mexico border fence to further fortify the border against people crossing illegally into the United States from Mexico on March 16, 2006 near the border town of near San Luis, south of Yuma, Arizona. Rep. Andy Biggs led a delegation of Republican lawmakers including John Joyce. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)

The office of Rep. John Joyce on Tuesday pulled back the congressman's bogus claim that immigrants seeking refuge over the Arizona border brought drug-resistant strains of tuberculosis to the U.S. 

Joyce made the false claim in a briefing with reporters during a congressional trip led by Arizona GOP Rep. Andy Biggs last week to the U.S.-Mexican border near Yuma, Ariz. The claim was then echoed in the national press.

Trade, infrastructure, health care issues dominate K Street
Uncertainties in Washington haven’t dampened hopes for legislative deal-making

K Street spending in the first quarter of 2019 shows business interests are still looking for openings to help broker big-scope legislative deals before presidential politics takes hold by 2020. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The renegotiated trade deal with Canada and Mexico, an elusive infrastructure package and debate over prescription drug prices dominated the lobbying agendas of some of the biggest spenders on K Street early this year, setting the legislative stage for the rest of 2019.

The tumult of the Trump administration and the uncertainty of divided party control on Capitol Hill have kept business interests on the defense while also looking for openings to help broker big-scope legislative deals before presidential politics takes hold by 2020.

Does successful prostate surgery mean Sen. Michael Bennet will join the 2020 field?
Colorado Democrat had been planning presidential run before cancer diagnosis

Sen. Michael Bennet, D-Colo., recently underwent successful prostate cancer surgery. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Colorado Democratic Sen. Michael Bennet’s prostate cancer surgery was successful.

“Last weekend, Michael underwent surgery and is recovering at his home in Colorado. His doctors report the surgery was completely successful and he requires no further treatment. Michael and his family deeply appreciate the well wishes and support from Coloradans and others across the country, and he looks forward to returning to work after the recess,” spokeswoman Courtney Gidner said in a statement.

Mueller says messaging apps likely destroyed Trump-Russia evidence
Tech challenges prevented special counsel from establishing full picture of what happened

Some of the individuals interviewed by the special counsel’s office communicated using apps that “do not provide for long term retention of data or communication records,” according to the Mueller report. (Carl Court/Getty Images file photo)

Special counsel Robert S. Mueller III concluded that there was insufficient evidence to bring criminal charges against individuals connected with President Donald Trump’s campaign for their ties to Russia, but he said the investigation faced numerous challenges, including technological ones, in establishing a full picture of what transpired in 2015 and 2016.

“While the investigation identified numerous links between individuals with ties to the Russian government and individuals associated with the Trump Campaign, the evidence was not sufficient to support criminal charges,” Mueller wrote in his report made public Thursday by the Justice Department.

Democrats launch Tax Day ad attack aimed at GOP overhaul
Effort on Facebook signals 2018 messaging on tax law is here to stay for 2020

The DCCC is attacking Texas Rep. Pete Olson in its latest round of digital ads (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

To coincide with Tax Day, the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee is rolling out digital ads on Monday attacking 12 Republicans for the GOP tax plan that passed during the 115th Congress.

The new Facebook ads, obtained first by Roll Call, signal Democrats will continue to use the 2017 tax overhaul, which passed with only Republican votes, as a key part of their economic message heading into 2020, when the party will be trying to protect their midterm gains and expand the map by investing heavily in such places as Texas.

Your email address could be worth $8 to a political campaign
With emphasis on small donors, Democrats are under pressure to grow email lists

Presidential candidate and former Texas Rep. Beto O’Rourke, seen here at an Austin rally for his 2018 Senate race, has spent more than $8.6 million on Facebook ads over the last year. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

With Democrats up and down the ballot eschewing corporate PAC money, and the Democratic National Committee setting a grassroots fundraising threshold to get onto the presidential debate stage, connecting with small donors is more important than ever. 

Email remains one of the best ways to do that, and with the emphasis on small donors, Democratic candidates are under even more pressure to grow their distribution lists.

Democrats blast Trump at Judiciary hearing for ‘emboldening’ white nationalists
‘Some hateful ideological rhetoric that originates in the United States is now used to inspire terror worldwide,’ Nadler says

Chairman Jerrold Nadler, left, and ranking member Doug Collins  both condemned white nationalism and the rise in hate crimes in the U.S. in recent years. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Democrats on the House Judiciary Committee criticized President Donald Trump on Tuesday of using rhetoric that has encouraged the spread of white nationalism and hate crimes.

“As the New Zealand attack showed, some hateful ideological rhetoric that originates in the United States is now used to inspire terror worldwide,” Chairman Jerrold Nadler said at a hearing on the rise of hate crimes and white nationalism in the U.S. in recent years.

Rep. Clay Higgins’ ‘Cajun John Wayne’ videos draw criticism ... again
The video follows 3 fires at black Baptist churches in ten days

Rep. Clay Higgins, R-La., reprised his role as a “Crime Stoppers” tough guy this week. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Clay Higgins reprised his role as a tough-talking sheriff’s deputy nicknamed “Cajun John Wayne” this week condemning fires that engulfed three predominantly black Louisiana churches. But the Republican drew criticism for rebuking the violence without acknowledging his past inflammatory statements and endorsements of anti-government militia groups.

Fires at the Baptist churches in St. Landry Parish, Louisiana, are prompting fears that they were the targets of arson in a racist hate crime. Investigators have been cautious in their public statements, but acknowledged Sunday that the blazes are connected. 

If your taxes are a complicated mess, you’re not alone
Americans spend too much time, money and energy each year trying to understand and follow the tax code

By Fichtner’s estimate, the total economic loss (the costs of complying, lobbying and changed behavior) from the tax code may be up to a trillion dollars per year. And that was before the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 caused new confusion for many filers. (Andrew Burton/Getty Images file photo)

OPINION — Washington, D.C., frequently gets wrapped up in debates over the tax code. Proposals for new wealth taxes, changes to marginal tax rates, or adjusting the estate tax capture the imagination of policy wonks. But such discussions often overlook the most important aspect of these policies — how the tax code is administered.

In practice, these administrative issues could make or break any attempt at reform, as well as the tax code as a whole. In a new paper for the Bipartisan Policy Center released today, Bill Gale, Jeff Trinca and I point to three fundamental issues with our tax system.