North Dakota

Bannon, Papadopoulos, NRA complying with House Dems’ Trump corruption probe
House Judiciary Chairman Nadler has requested documents from 81 people and groups close to Trump

Former White House strategist Steve Bannon is among the people who have provided documents to House Democrats as part of a Judiciary Committee investigation. (Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images file photo)

Steve Bannon, George Papadopoulos, and the National Rifle Association are among the eight people and entities who have provided documents to House Democrats as part of the Judiciary Committee’s investigation into alleged corruption and obstruction of justice by President Donald Trump and his inner circle, according to a Republican aide with knowledge of the situation.

In February, Chairman Jerrold Nadler set a deadline for March 18 for the 81 people and entities to provide documents for the probe. That deadline passed with less than 10 percent in compliance, the GOP aide said.

Some climate change panel members are literally invested in the issue
Panel members have investments in fossil fuel companies, and at least two have ties to clean-energy industries

Rep. Kelly Armstrong, R-N.D., attends a House Oversight and Reform Committee business meeting in the Rayburn Building in January. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

One member of the House committee created to address climate change stands out for what he owns: hundreds of oil and gas wells in North Dakota oil fields worth millions of dollars.

Rep. Kelly Armstrong, a Republican from North Dakota, received at least $400,000 from those wells and as much as $1.1 million in the previous year, as well as $75,000 in salary from Armstrong Corp., his family’s oil and gas business. He also owns at least 289 wells, worth between $2.9 million and $11.5 million, though in a recent interview Armstrong said he owns more than 300 wells.

‘We’re not a subpoena production factory’: Nadler moving carefully on obstruction probe
House Judiciary Committee has requested documents from 81 people and entities tied to Trump for it obstruction investigation

Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., is investigating possible obstruction of justice by President Donald Trump and his associates. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Documents requested from key associates of Donald Trump as part of the House Judiciary Committee’s investigation into obstruction of justice and corruption are beginning to trickle in, the top Democrat on the committee indicated Thursday.

About half of the 81 people and entities connected to Trump who received letters and document requests in February from Chairman Jerrold Nadler have been in touch with the New York Democrat’s staff about complying with the committee’s probe.

Members of Congress are rich with student debt
Reauthorization of Higher Education Act could affect repayment, affordability

68 members, or 13 percent of Congress, reported that either they or their family members have student loan debt. (Illustration by Chris Hale/CQ Roll Call)

As lawmakers look to reshape the federal loan process in the upcoming reauthorization of the Higher Education Act, a cohort knows firsthand the pain of rising college costs — 68 members, or 13 percent of Congress, reported that either they or their family members are mired in student debt.

Collectively, the 44 Democrats and 24 Republicans have higher education liabilities of $2.5 million, according to recent financial disclosures. The median student loan debt is $15,000, while average debt is $37,000.

Pelosi OK with investigating Trump children: ‘They are advisers to the president’
Democrats are ‘investigating certain subjects. Whoever falls into that net, falls into the net,’ House speaker says

Speaker Nancy Pelosi signed off Thursday on Democrats pursuing information from President Donald Trump’s children in the course of their oversight investigations. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Some House Democrats have expressed reservations about going after President Donald Trump’s children in their oversight investigations into his administration, 2016 campaign and business empire.

Speaker Nancy Pelosi is not one of them.

‘Off-script’ Trump intensifies campaign to ‘destroy’ investigations
GOP insider sees ‘PR war’ as House Democrats bore deeper with sweeping document request

President Donald Trump at the Conservative Political Action Conference on Saturday, where he attacked those who are investigating his 2016 campaign and business dealings. (Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump went on the attack over the weekend before a conservative audience and in a series of tweets, signaling a legal and public relations strategy that will likely decide whether he wins a second term.

For over two hours Saturday, Trump veered from topic to topic and political foe to political foe during a fiery appearance at the Conservative Political Action Conference outside Washington. The list of federal, state and congressional investigations into his 2016 campaign and business dealings are all “bullshit,” he said before mocking his former attorney general. A day later, he tried to blame House Democrats for his failure to make any progress with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un last week.

House launches broad document request on Trump administration
The request is the clearest sign yet of the broad scope of oversight Democrats intend to pursue

Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., holds a press conference with House Judiciary Committee Democrats to announce new legislation to protect Special Counsel Robert Mueller's investigation on April 12, 2018. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The House Judiciary Committee on Monday unveiled a sweeping request for documents in its congressional investigation into President Donald Trump on allegations of obstruction of justice, corruption and other abuses of power — the clearest sign yet of the broad scope of oversight Democrats intend to pursue.

House Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., announced that letters went to 81 agencies, entities and individuals believed to have information on Trump, his associates and members of the Trump administration. The effort is to “begin building a record,” Nadler said, because Trump has accountability for “near-daily attacks on our basic legal, ethical, and constitutional rules and norms.”

Trump says he intends to cooperate with Democrats’ new obstruction probe — maybe
81 people and entities, including members of the Trump family, received letters requesting documents

President Donald Trump’s ex-campaign chief Paul Manafort arrives to the E. Barrett Prettyman United States Courthouse in Washington, D.C., to appear in U.S. District Court for a hearing on whether his bail should be revoked Friday, June 14, 2018. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The House Judiciary Committee has requested a sweeping list of documents and information about possible obstruction of justice and corruption by President Donald Trump and his associates, including former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort and one of his closest advisers. 

Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler’s requests to Manafort and his public affairs consultant, Jason Maloni, could indicate Democrats on the committee believe there may have been back channel communications between the White House and Trump’s former associates about presidential pardons.

Rao nomination advances amid pressure on freshman senator
Missouri’s Josh Hawley felt the full force of his party’s judicial confirmation machine

Republican Sen. Josh Hawley of Missouri. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

In the days before the Senate Judiciary Committee advanced Neomi Rao’s nomination to the federal appeals court in Washington, Missouri Republican freshman Josh Hawley felt the full pressure of his party’s judicial confirmation machine.

“I know that there are some inside this building, and outside of it, who would prefer that I do as I’m instructed and go along to get along,” Hawley said before the committee’s Thursday vote. “And I’m sorry to disappoint them, but that is not going to happen.”

Democrats ‘went low’ on Twitter leading up to 2018
An analysis of tweets from candidates running for Senate leading up to Election Day

Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., arrives for the confirmation hearing for Neomi Rao, nominee to be U.S. circuit judge for the District of Columbia Circuit, in the Senate Judiciary Committee on Feb. 5. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

ANALYSIS — Voters in 2016 repeatedly heard Democrats cry out against negative Republican rhetoric, especially from the party’s presidential nominee Donald Trump.

“When they go low … ?” came the call at rally podiums. “We go high!” constituents would shout.