recess

When you get a tattoo while traveling with the boss ...
Staffer for South Dakota rep opted for ink on a recent recess trip back home

Hannah Kagey, a staffer for South Dakota Rep. Dusty Johnson, got a tattoo while visiting a Sioux Falls constituent with her boss. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

It was a “whirlwind” day, Hannah Kagey recalled.

The legislative assistant for Rep. Dusty Johnson trekked alongside her boss on a busy Monday during the August recess. The agenda for the day? Town halls and many a conversation with the South Dakota Republican’s constituents, or “bosses” as he refers to them, according to spokeswoman Jazmine Kemp.

Tuesday Bruceday: A day in the life of Roy Blunt’s bearded dragon
’He gets a lot of attention around the office,’ senator’s spokeswoman says

Bruce, Missouri Sen. Roy Blunt’s bearded dragon, poses for a picture in the Russell Senate Office Building on Sept. 4. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Inhabiting the back corner of Roy Blunt’s staff quarters in the Russell Senate Office Building is the cold-blooded staff favorite, Bruce.

Despite his scaly skin and long tail, he’s a fixture of the Missouri Republican’s team. That is also despite his preference to hang out in the background and mostly avoid the press (Heard on the Hill being the exception.) After all, the only scoops Bruce has to offer are those of worms and freeze-dried crickets — not the kind sought by Capitol Hill reporters.

Capitol Ink | Capitol Hell

How I spent my summer vacation: Congressional Hits and Misses, Recess Edition
2019 August Recess

A man skateboards outside of Capitol Hill in Washington on Wednesday September 4, 2019. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

Congress has been out of session this past month, but the madness doesn’t stop when lawmakers head home. Check out Sen. Bernie Sanders getting bested by a speed bag, Sen. Martha McSally showing off her dog on local news, Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez playing with a penguin and Sen. Charles E. Schumer joining a game of ladder ball.

Capitol Ink | Last One Out

Marc Veasey, are you my Uber?
Texas Democrat favors a little Brooks & Dunn behind the wheel

Texas Rep. Marc Veasey, left, took a few spins as an Uber driver on Thursday back home in the Dallas-Fort Worth area. Above, Veasey poses with his last drop-off of the day. (Courtesy Twitter/Rep. Marc Veasey)

If you assume that all members of Congress get from Point A to Point B by way of large black SUVs hauled by well-dressed drivers in flat caps, pump the brakes.

Marc Veasey is here to prove that he can not only drive himself, he can also drive around residents of the greater Dallas-Fort Worth area. The Democratic congressman from Texas took a few spins around the Lone Star block as an Uber driver Thursday afternoon, and his trips were anything but lone.

Senate Starting Campaign Recess Two Weeks Early, Gone Through Midterm Election
Upper chamber reaches agreement on nominations

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., center, will allow the Senate to depart early for the remainder of the midterm campaign cycle after reaching an agreement with Democrats to speed up consideration on several judicial and executive nominations. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Senate leaders on Thursday reached an agreement to accelerate consideration of several judicial nominations — a deal that will allow the chamber to depart two weeks early for its midterm campaign recess. 

The Senate will recess through the Nov. 6 election and is scheduled to return the following Tuesday.

Podcast: House Lawmakers Leave Town With Much to Do Before Midterms
CQ on Congress, Episode 113

Speaker of the House Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis.(Photo By Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call)

Capitol Ink | Working Recess

GOP Members Face Tough Town Halls at Home
Man tells LaMalfa ‘May you die in pain’ over health care vote

Republican Rep. Mark Meadows  faced criticism at a town hall in his North Carolina district for his leadership on the House health care repeal and replace plan. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

While August recess gives members of Congress a chance to escape Washington, D.C., and spend time in their districts, it also means answering to their constituents.

As town halls replace committee meetings during this last stretch of summer, Republican congressmen find themselves facing increasingly critical and at times raucous crowds of voters.