Rob Woodall

The fix-up-Congress committee takes on a fresh agenda for 2020
With impeachment done, modernization panel looks at more civility and new technology

Chairman Derek Kilmer, D-Wash., right, and vice chairman Rep. Tom Graves, R-Ga., are seen during a Select Committee on the Modernization of Congress in March 2019. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

It’s almost like an alternate universe.

Fresh off the bitterly partisan and acrimonious House impeachment vote, the Select Committee on the Modernization of Congress approved a slate of recommendations Thursday including some aimed at boosting civility and bipartisanship in the legislative branch.  

House to hold separate votes on Trump impeachment articles
Rules Committee finalizes procedure for Wednesday after contentious hearing spanning more than 10 hours

Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., called on her Democratic Caucus to join her on the floor on Wednesday before the House begins debate on the impeachment articles against President Donald Trump on Wednesday. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

The full House will debate and vote separately on two articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump on Wednesday, under a process set up by the House Rules Committee on Tuesday night after a contentious hearing that spanned more than 10 hours.

The Rules panel adopted a closed rule in a 9-4 party-line vote just after 9 p.m., which means no amendments to the articles will be considered on the House floor.

Impeachment news roundup: Dec. 17
House Republicans put up united front ahead of impeachment vote

Maryland Democratic Rep. Jamie Raskin, right, a House Judiciary Committee member, confers with counsel Barry Berke during the House Rules Committee markup of articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump on Dec. 17. Judiciary Committee ranking member Doug Collins, R-Ga., is at left. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

House Republicans huddled Tuesday evening for their weekly conference meeting and emerged with confidence that their party will remain united in opposing the articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump that Democrats are bringing to the floor Wednesday.

“Have you not seen us united? Have you not witnessed us united?” House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy said when a reporter asked if he was confident Republicans will unanimously oppose the articles. “The reason why I know we’ll stay united is because the facts are on our side ... the process has been failed, [Democrats] picked a timeline and they stuck to their timeline without having any facts for it.”

As Super Bowl LIV draws near, Congress still tackling one of the event’s biggest problems
Florida Rep. Donna E. Shalala leads human trafficking hearing ahead of the big game in Miami

Katherine Fernandez Rundle, state attorney for Miami-Dade County, flanked by Rodney Barreto, chairman of the Miami Super Bowl Host Committee, and Kathy Andersen, executive director of The Women’s Fund Miami-Dade, addresses the media in Miami on Nov. 6 as they unveil a campaign by local, state and federal agencies and partners meant to combat sex trafficking leading up to and beyond Super Bowl LIV. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images file photo)

The question of whether the Super Bowl attracts higher volumes of human trafficking in its host city has long been debated. At the least, it provides a megaplatform, and opportunity, for awareness.

“We do have a comprehensive approach for Miami-Dade, and that’s been put together over the years, but the advantage of the Super Bowl for us is to educate the entire community,” Rep. Donna E. Shalala told HOH.

Georgia Democrat dramatizes message on health care — by giving up her own
Nabilah Islam cancels her health insurance to help cover living expenses while she runs for Congress

Rep. Rob Woodall, R-Ga., narrowly won his seat in 2018 but is not running again. One Democrat seeking the nomination to succeed him is going without health insurance to dramatize the burden working families face. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A Georgia Democrat in one of the most competitive House districts in the country is canceling her health insurance, a risky move that she says is  financially necessary as she runs for Congress.

Nabilah Islam is one of a handful of Democrats running for the party’s nomination in the open 7th District. Islam is trying to save money, but she’s also making a political point — about who can afford to run for Congress and the necessity of fixing America’s health care system.

Why Georgia matters to Democrats in 2020
Democrats think they can make the state a presidential, Senate and House battleground

Taking the stage before the Nov. 20 Democratic presidential debate were Sen. Cory Booker of New Jersey, Rep. Tulsi Gabbard of Hawaii, Sen. Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota, Mayor Pete Buttigieg of South Bend, Ind., Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, former Vice President Joe Biden, Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont, Sen. Kamala Harris of California, and businessmen Andrew Yang and Tom Steyer. (MSNBC Photo)

Several of the presidential candidates who debated Wednesday night in Atlanta were sticking around on Thursday, even though some of them will be out of the race by the time Georgia holds its March 24 primary and the state has not backed a Democrat for president since 1992.

The reason for that is that Democrats up and down the ballot are expecting intense contests in Georgia next year, including two for Senate seats that could determine which party controls the chamber.

States in the South with outsize roles in the 2020 elections
Florida, Georgia and North Carolina among key states to watch

Democratic Rep. Charlie Crist is one of several incumbents facing competitive races in Florida, a perennial battleground in the presidential race. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

 

 

Photos of the Week: Halloween and impeachment collide
The week of Nov. 1 as captured by Roll Call’s photojournalists

Rep. Thomas Massie, R-Ky., walks by a protester outside the Capitol after the House voted on its resolution outlining the next steps in the impeachment inquiry of President Donald Trump on Thursday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Democrats line up to challenge David Perdue. But what about the other Georgia Senate seat?
Jon Ossoff announced his candidacy for the Senate on Tuesday

Jon Ossoff is running for Senate in Georgia. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Georgia got another Senate candidate Tuesday — a familiar face who’s running in the same race that several Democrats are already running for.

Jon Ossoff, who lost the most expensive special House election in U.S. history, is challenging Republican incumbent David Perdue.

Why Georgia will be the wildest ride in politics heading into 2020
Peach State is playing host to several marquee races next year

Georgia Democrat Lucy McBath last year won a suburban Atlanta seat once held by Newt Gingrich, a sign of the state’s shifting demographics. Republicans are determined to take the seat back next year. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

OPINION — You could almost hear the collective “Holy #&%!” across Georgia last week after Sen. Johnny Isakson’s surprise announcement that he will retire from the Senate at the end of the year. The first reaction among Republicans and Democrats alike was that the highly respected GOP senator would be sorely missed.

The next reaction was the realization that for the next year and a half, politics in Georgia will be one wild ride. The 2020 ballot in the state had already been filled with marquee races — GOP Sen. David Perdue’s fight for a second term, two House seats up for grabs in once-solidly Republican suburban Atlanta, and President Donald Trump’s reelection bid. The addition of the race to replace Isakson makes Georgia a legitimate battleground for both parties for the first time in nearly two decades.