Trade

Why Trump Spent His Friday Night in Deep-Red Southwest Ohio
Rep. Steve Chabot won re-election by 18 points in 2016. Now he faces a closer race

President Donald Trump speaks to supporters at a rally at the Erie Insurance Arena in Erie, Pa., on Wednesday night. Two days later, he took his campaign road show to Ohio. (Jeff Swensen/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump took his campaign road show to Ohio on Friday, a state that is a microcosm of the fight his Republican Party faces in next month’s midterm elections.

On the one hand, a recent Suffolk University-Cincinnati Enquirer poll showed a boost in Republican support and enthusiasm for Trump — and, he hopes, GOP candidates by extension. But on the other, those same surveys suggest the overall electorate in the Buckeye State is more likely to vote for Democratic candidates than Republican ones.

K Street Turns Its Lonely Eyes to Grassley
Republican holds the key to cascading possibilities, from Judiciary to Finance to Banking

Will Judiciary Chairman Charles Grassley, R-Iowa, make the leap to head the Finance Committee next year? (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Fresh off a divisive Supreme Court battle, Senate Judiciary Chairman Charles E. Grassley has a complicated decision to make next month that has the business world watching with keen interest: whether to make the jump over to the Finance Committee chairmanship in the 116th Congress.

“Ask me Nov. 7,” was all the Iowa Republican would say earlier this week on the topic. But the allure of returning to the helm of perhaps the most powerful committee in Congress, with jurisdiction over taxes, trade and health care policy, can’t be lost on Grassley, who was Finance chairman for part of 2001 and again from 2003 through 2006.

Memo to GOP: You’ve Got a Winning Message and It’s Not Pelosi
Republicans should be touting the success of their economic policies

President Donald Trump and congressional Republicans celebrate the passage of the tax overhaul last December. With 27 days to go until Nov. 6, Republicans need to stress the successes of their economic policies, Winston writes. (Alex Wong/Getty Images file photo)

OPINION — Republicans have a great economic story to tell if they are willing to tell it. They have less than a month to make their case to voters that the economic policies that House Republicans began pushing in 2010 are finally paying off. Now is the time to reinforce success, not change direction.

On Friday, the Labor Department reported that the unemployment rate dropped to 3.7 percent, its lowest mark in nearly 50 years. Remarkably, unemployment has stayed under 4 percent for five of the past six months and remains at near record lows for African-Americans, Hispanics and women.

Outgoing Haley Vows to Not Run for President in 2020
Ambassador can have any job if she wants to return, Trump says

U.S. ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley arrives to testify before a House Appropriations State, Foreign Operations and Related Programs Subcommittee hearing in Rayburn Building on the "United Nations and International Organizations FY2018 Budget" on June 27, 2017. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Departing UN Ambassador Nikki Haley denied she is stepping down later this year to prepare for a 2020 bid for the White House.

“I don’t have anything set on where I’m going to go,” she told reporters in the Oval Office. “I’m a believer in term limits.

Ryan-Linked PAC Hits North Carolina Democrat for Late Tax Payments
GOP Rep. George Holding in tight race with Linda Coleman in 2nd District

Rep. George Holding, R-N.C., participates in the House Ways and Means Committee Trade Subcommittee hearing on "The Effects of Tariffs on U.S. Agriculture and Rural Communities" on Wednesday, July 18, 2018. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The super PAC aligned with Speaker Paul D. Ryan on Monday released its second ad in North Carolina’s 2nd District, going after Democrat Linda Coleman for not paying her property taxes on time.

The new spot from Congressional Leadership Fund claims that Coleman, who is challenging Republican Rep. George Holding, has missed the deadline for paying her taxes “over 60 times.”

There’s Life Beyond the Hill but When Do You Explore It?
Former staffers share why they left

John Jones of Nareit just left his post as a House chief of staff for the private sector. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

John Jones was working on Iran sanctions legislation five years ago, when his boss, New York Sen. Charles E. Schumer, turned to Arizona Sen. John McCain and said, “Look, I’m for it, but you have to convince Jones.”

The exchange left Jones “stunned,” he recalled, but also empowered, as the weight of his responsibilities as Schumer’s national security director dawned on him.

Trump Says Democrats’ Opposition to Kavanaugh Fueled by ‘Rage’
President’s narrow loss in Minnesota in 2016 gives GOP leaders hope for miderms

President Donald Trump was in Minnesota for fundraisers and a campaign rally Thursday. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Senate Democrats’ opposition to Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh is fueled by “rage,” President Donald Trump said Thursday night at another raucous campaign rally, this time in Minnesota.

Trump again criticized Democrats for their handling of sexual assault allegations against his high court nominee less than 24 hours before a planned procedural vote that is expected to tee up a make-or-break Saturday confirmation vote.

Pence Accuses China of Trying to Upend ‘America’s Democracy’
Trump touts relationship with Xi, but has little to show for it

Vice President Mike Pence warned China to avoid meddling in "America's democracy" in a speech Thursday that likely will further chill relations with the Asian power. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

The Trump administration struck a hard line on China Thursday, with Vice President Mike Pence alleging that Russia’s meddling in U.S. elections “pales in comparison” to China’s ongoing actions.

The vice president accused the Chinese government of “employing a whole-of-government approach to advance its influence and benefit its interests.” He cited the conclusions of career U.S. intelligence officials as he said China is “employing this power in more proactive and coercive ways to interfere in the domestic policies and politics of the United States.”

Sen. Chuck Grassley Defends Personally Taking Trump’s Farm Bailout
Iowa Republican owns 750-acre farm

Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, will apply for a federal handout for his 750-acre farm. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Sen. Charles E. Grassley defended his intent to apply for a grant from the federal government for his farm business as part of President Donald Trump’s $12 billion bailout for farmers as they weather the fallout of his ongoing trade war. 

All farmers get the same deal, said Grassley, who grows corn and soybeans on his 750-acre farm in Iowa.

White House Puts ‘Fabergé Egg’ Ford in Frying Pan
Trump aides focus on Christine Blasey Ford’s ‘memory lapses,’ ‘factual inconsistencies’

President Trump heads for Marine One on the White House’s South Lawn on Monday. (John T. Bennett/CQ Roll Call)

ANALYSIS — Senior White House officials for two weeks treated Christine Blasey Ford, as one put it Wednesday, like a “Fabergé egg.” Then the woman who has accused Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh of sexual assault found out that, eventually, everything for President Donald Trump is still all about his base.

At the White House on Wednesday, the focus was on attacking Ford. Aides discussed her “memory lapses” and “factual inconsistencies” as they tried to paint her as an unreliable witness or an untruthful one. They turned up the heat on vulnerable Democratic senators to focus on the “facts” rather than “emotions” of the situation as they decide how to vote; they also reminded them of pro-Kavanaugh polls that could influence their decision. And, in the form of none other than presidential counselor Kellyanne Conway, who once said Ford deserved to be heard, Democrats were warned to avoid being “complicit” in a plan to “destroy” the nominee.